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taimoortariq
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Gold
Re: Too Quick to Blame
taimoortariq   9/7/2013 12:25:37 AM
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I agree William, actually that insight is a product of both education and experience and comes with time. So it is actually quite normal as well for the technicians to come up with the solution or debugging the problem better then engineer who has just joined the company. We can not just put a label directly based on the rank of the profession.

AnandY
User Rank
Gold
Re;perfect designs, simple problems
AnandY   9/4/2013 2:32:11 AM
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In my experience (and am sure you have experienced this too if you engineer in any field) the simplest flaws are always the most difficult to spot in a great design. I think its because we are never quite sure that we got everything as we hoped and when we do so and the design doesn't work we never spot the most obvious problems

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Too Quick to Blame
Rob Spiegel   9/3/2013 3:47:43 PM
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Good point, Chuck. On first appearance, it would seem the robot is messing up -- after all, that's where the trouble is occurring.

apresher
User Rank
Blogger
Blame Game
apresher   9/3/2013 3:19:35 PM
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BrainiacV, I agree that the most complex (or what is viewed as complex) always seems to get the majority of the attention when something goes wrong.

BrainiacV
User Rank
Platinum
Computers get the blame
BrainiacV   9/3/2013 2:54:46 PM
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My experience has been that once you connect a computer to something, it is percieved that only the computer can fail.

I used to do computer controlled conveyor systems.  My programming partner had to fly halfway across the US because one of our installations had stopped working.

Nobody bothered to check the fuses.

 

And to go off on a mini rant, the computers were expected to overcome all hardware deficiencies. For the most part, we did, but when things failed, we got the blame.

I can relate to the programmers getting the blame for Denver airport, I knew all along it had to be a hardware problem even though the press was full of failed software design stories. Just because the motors start and the product moves, does not mean it is a control issue.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Too Quick to Blame
William K.   9/3/2013 10:06:36 AM
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As is usually the case, it is the individual with the greatest insight into the system who is able to solve the problem most effectively. Sometimes other get lucky and happen to arrive at the correct answer, and on rare occasions the solution is so obvious that a manager could see it. But usually it is the individual with the most accirate and complete insight who comes up with the solution.

GlennA
User Rank
Gold
Re: Too Quick to Blame
GlennA   9/1/2013 10:16:08 AM
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I find it interesting that many posts suggest that the Engineer is the person that supposedly knows or finds the root cause. As an Automation Technician, I have often been in the position of having to troubleshoot to find the actual root cause, often having to prove the Engineer's guess to be wrong. And that annoys the Engineer.

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Error Accumilation
shehan   8/31/2013 11:58:00 AM
NO RATINGS
@taimoortariq – Well explained the input instructions and on time component is vital for the robot to perform its task successfully. We cannot blame the robot because it's just another machine and cannot think by its self. 

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Too Quick to Blame
shehan   8/31/2013 11:56:28 AM
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@taimoortariq – yes an engineer has more knowledge then a technician hence we expect the engineer to understand the problem before coming to a conclusion.

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Too Quick to Blame
shehan   8/31/2013 11:54:57 AM
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@tekochip- yes sometimes we don't see what the problem is, instead we just start fixing and replacing components. Whereas like you said the problem might be quite small.

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