HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 3/3
shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Too Quick to Blame
shehan   8/31/2013 11:52:59 AM
NO RATINGS
@Charles- it's always good to have certain function within your control than giving everything to the robot. This will help you identify errors and correct them as soon as you discover it.

 

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Too Quick to Blame
shehan   8/31/2013 11:50:59 AM
NO RATINGS
@notarboca – True it's not correct to blame the machine for giving your wrong results if you gave the incorrect instructions or data. 

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Too Quick to Blame
shehan   8/31/2013 11:48:59 AM
NO RATINGS
@Rob – It's all about the instructions you give in that decides the result you get. As the always say GIGO (Garbage In Garbage Out).

taimoortariq
User Rank
Gold
Error Accumilation
taimoortariq   8/30/2013 6:38:45 PM
NO RATINGS
Since the robot is not running on adaptive control, It will just run the commands it has been fed, it is definitely necessary that all of the inputs that are given to the robots at different times are carefully timed and accurate. Otherwise the error will keep on accumulating and then it will seem like that the robot is malfunctioning.

taimoortariq
User Rank
Gold
Re: Too Quick to Blame
taimoortariq   8/30/2013 6:34:51 PM
NO RATINGS
@Charles, I agree. Although it is not expected from an engineer to come up with a complain so quick. One can expect this from a technician whose job is only to run the machine. But an engineer is suppose to carefully see the pattern of the robot and figure out the discrepency in it. 

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Too Quick to Blame
tekochip   8/30/2013 6:02:27 PM
NO RATINGS
The common assumption is to always blame the most complicated component.  Auto mechanics seem to blame the "Brain Box" before looking for a vacuum leak.  I had a new car that was running rough and several controls were replaced while the car continued to run poorly.  Out of frustration I opened the hood of the two week old car and found that a wire harness had been burned clear through vacuum hoses and other wires.  I informed the dealership that I would perform the repair myself, rather than have their ham-fisted blacksmiths crimp a handful of butt splices to the harness.  I used new wires and solder.

From another thread, I had that car for 170K before giving it to a nephew who drove it for another 90K.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Too Quick to Blame
Charles Murray   8/30/2013 5:39:06 PM
NO RATINGS
In retrospect, this seems like an obvious solution. But in the heat of a workday, when most people don't have time or simply don't want to watch a few cycles, I can easily see how this could happen. It's why engineers and troubleshooters have jobs.

notarboca
User Rank
Gold
Re: Too Quick to Blame
notarboca   8/30/2013 2:35:18 PM
NO RATINGS
I don't think I would even attempt to blame the robot controller functionality.  After all there are probably a lot of them out there, and yours is the only one acting up?

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Too Quick to Blame
Ann R. Thryft   8/30/2013 1:29:52 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree, Rob. It reminds me of the old adage GI, GO (garbage in, garbage out).

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Too Quick to Blame
Rob Spiegel   8/30/2013 11:56:24 AM
NO RATINGS
This story is essentailly a jump-too-quick-to-conclusion problem. This story shows that it pays to think everything trhough before pointing the finger.

<<  <  Page 3/3


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
BMW has already incorporated more than 10,000 3D-printed parts in the Rolls-Royce Phantom and intends to expand the use of 3D printing in its cars even more in the future. Meanwhile, Daimler has started using additive manufacturing for producing spare parts in Mercedes-Benz Trucks.
Researchers have been developing a number of nano- and micro-scale technologies that can be used for implantable medical technology for the treatment of disease, diagnostics, prevention, and other health-related applications.
SABIC's lightweighting polycarbonate glazing materials have appeared for the first time in a production car: the rear quarter window of Toyota's special edition 86 GRMN sports car, where they're saving 50% of its weight compared to conventional glass.
Take a look at some of the best movies that include self-aware machines.
An engineer in the United Kingdom has found inspiration in nature for the design of bridges that are far stronger and more durable than current designs.
More:Blogs|News
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Jul 11 - 15, Embedded System Design Techniques™ - Debugging Real-time Embedded Software – Hands on
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7 | 8 | 9 | 10


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2016 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service