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AJ2X
User Rank
Silver
Re: Not the whole country
AJ2X   8/30/2013 8:59:12 AM
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Yeah, that "only a German" comment was way out of line.  It should never have made it to print.  Rotten components exist everywhere -- sometimes caused by poor design, inappropriate materials, sloppy manufacturing, lousy maintenance -- and are not the provenance of a single country.  It would have been better if the writer had expanded on the failure mechanism in the fuseholder rather than the country of origin.

radio-active
User Rank
Iron
Re: Not the whole country
radio-active   8/30/2013 8:30:29 AM
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Why would you say only the Germans could make a fuse holder that fails?

I'm not even German and I find that offensive.

Fuse holders (cartridge style) are among the most failure prone electro-mechanical components I've come across. The typically have poor quality contacts, inadequate spring pressure, and use metals dissimilar to the fuse itself. Any exposure to water or humidity and the corrosion begins. I've found them bad in motorcycles, boats, and trailers. Take them apart and you'll find bad wire crimps, green corrosion, fatigued springs, tin whisker growth, and degraded plastics.

I always end up replacing them with sealed type automotive holders, the ones with attached rubber boots. These will outlast the machine they are installed in. Just did this in my boat last weekend.

Pretty basic troubleshooting. Not really newsworthy.

a.saji
User Rank
Silver
Re: Not the whole country
a.saji   8/29/2013 11:49:27 PM
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@Shehan: Good point on safety precautions. Its vital that you follow the steps since you never know where things might pop up in electricity. Its not visible at any point. So being careful is the best way.     

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Not the whole country
shehan   8/29/2013 1:34:14 PM
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@Rob – It's always good to be careful when you remove internal components, always make sure you remove the plug from the power outlet. Also its vital to wear rubber foot wear to ensure you don't damage internal components for static electricity. 

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Not the whole country
shehan   8/29/2013 1:30:06 PM
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@tekochip – It's always good to trouble shoot than just replacing a fuse. It might take a bit more time to check the connections but sure it's worth than replacing the whole product. 

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Not the whole country
Rob Spiegel   8/29/2013 1:22:07 PM
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Yes, it is surprising. right up there with "The computer wonldn't work because it wasn't plugged in."

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Not the whole country
tekochip   8/29/2013 11:46:21 AM
NO RATINGS
That's certainly an odd problem and a good example of why I tell people to troubleshoot everything rather than just replacing parts.

 

I'm not sure I would suggest anything designed in a particular country would be faulty, though. 

Well, maybe China.

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