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Elizabeth M
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Re: From the Design News Surf Team
Elizabeth M   10/24/2013 5:30:53 AM
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Ha, that's not a bad idea, Cabe (the chair and cupholder). I assume you mean an actual chair and cupholder that you can use? Or just an image of them? You bring up a good point about how customization and 3D printing make pretty much anything possible when it comes to what a person wants in their specific design.

It also makes me think of the idea my surfer friends and I often bring up that we would like to start a cafe boat that sits just beyond the surf break (on days when the sea is calm between sets and not rough) for those long sessions when we get hungry or thirsty in the water. The idea is that we can just paddle over and have a drink or a sandwich, then paddle back to the lineup. In this case, your cupholder would come in handy!

Cabe Atwell
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Re: From the Design News Surf Team
Cabe Atwell   10/23/2013 6:15:08 PM
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Customizing a board is an incredibly difficult task even for manufacturers that stick to traditional methods. 3D printing gives surfers another option when choosing a board for themselves. For me, I'd have to have a 3D printed board with a chair and cup-holder printed into the design.

Elizabeth M
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Re: From the Design News Surf Team
Elizabeth M   9/5/2013 4:47:21 AM
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Thanks, Ann. Even though I have said a few times how I prefer handmade boards, I do think you're right and this will be a boon for boards that fall somewhere in between handmade and mass produced. It's a nice middle ground for someone who wants something built for them but doesn't have access to a custom shaper. And who knows where the technology may go in the future?

Rob Spiegel
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Re: From the Design News Surf Team
Rob Spiegel   9/4/2013 7:19:41 PM
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Elizabeth, I meant the view that some surfers will not want to move away from the art of a skilled board maker. Same thing happened in tennis. Many wanted the sport to stick to wooden rackets.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: From the Design News Surf Team
Ann R. Thryft   9/4/2013 12:45:38 PM
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Great story, Elizabeth. Surfboards are yet another product that can benefit from 3D printing's customization abilities.

Elizabeth M
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Blogger
Re: From the Design News Surf Team
Elizabeth M   9/4/2013 6:59:03 AM
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Which view, Rob? The "Stradivarius" one? Well it's pretty valid I would say, but only a surfer might fully understand. And surfing itself is so complex anyway--there are so many nuances to it. So to design a custom board built to perform a certain way for a surfer is in and of itself a very complex and mathematical task. So there are a lot of elements to this. And surfing might as well be a religion, so there are always going to be people who don't want to upset sacred rites and rituals, which custom and handmade surfboard shaping and producing is!

Elizabeth M
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Blogger
Re: From the Design News Surf Team
Elizabeth M   9/4/2013 6:55:45 AM
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Sounds great! I live on the southwest coast of Portugal and surf some world-class beaches on a custom-made 9"3' longboard. I am totally with you on the comparison...there really is none! But I'm still curious to see what comes out of the 3D world.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: From the Design News Surf Team
Rob Spiegel   9/3/2013 3:29:29 PM
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I expected someone would take this poiint of view -- and it's probably a valid view.

notarboca
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Gold
Re: From the Design News Surf Team
notarboca   9/3/2013 1:12:16 PM
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Elizabeth M, I've got a Quiksilver board.  I surf mostly the east coast of Florida, from Sebastion Inlet down to Boca Raton--wherever the waves are! Custom board=Stradivarius vs. what they rent your kid at the music shop.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: From the Design News Surf Team
Elizabeth M   9/3/2013 4:37:22 AM
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Well even though that's how 3D printing started, Pubudu, I am under the perception that that is changing, and 3D is becoming more affordable for mass production. Although I don't think it's really taking over traditional manufacturing yet, I think there is a change in process. But maybe some others who have a bit more knowledge about this can weigh in?

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