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Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Raw science
Rob Spiegel   9/9/2013 8:04:22 PM
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Ann, I agree with what you're saying about SE Asian cooking. It's pretty easy to duplicate the basic ingredients. I find the trick is with the spices (much like Indian cooking). I think the trick is learning the blend of spices that make up the overall flavor. I ran into this while trying to learn how to make Pad Thai recently. The recipes I found were surprisingly useless. Don't know why. So I got there through many home experiments.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Raw science
Ann R. Thryft   9/6/2013 1:10:29 PM
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I do something similar, but usually without writing notes. I file it sort of visually/taste-wise. It's hard to describe, but it seems to work for reverse engineering a dish I've eaten. Also, I read a lot of similar recipes which shows me the common ingredients and their proportions. After all, it's just a form of applied chemistry. I also find this method works very well with SE Asian cooking, which combines many ingredients at the last minute, many of them fresh. So they're actually quite simple if you have the key ingredients.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Raw science
Rob Spiegel   9/3/2013 11:51:19 AM
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One thing that's fun is to try to replicate a restaurant dish. My mom taught me to jot down notes while you're at the restaurant and you're eating a dish you want to replicate. I've done that with Thai and Indian dishes. Even when I miss, it sometimes comes out just fine.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Raw science
Ann R. Thryft   8/28/2013 12:27:20 PM
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Rob, I've gone in the opposite direction. I usually end up "fixing" a recipe before I make it the first time, unless it includes very different ingredients/combos of same, or different methods that I'm unfamiliar with. And sometimes, I start making up recipes without looking at any first. That's really fun.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Raw science
Rob Spiegel   8/27/2013 4:39:04 PM
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Good point, Ann. I'm getting better at following recipes these days, but for decades, I viewed the recipe as simply the starting off point.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Raw science
Cabe Atwell   8/27/2013 2:35:42 PM
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Those properties exhibited by the zinc-based compound are astounding. I have no doubt that they can be adapted for more than just artificial muscles and touch screens. 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Raw science
Ann R. Thryft   8/27/2013 1:58:14 PM
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I agree, Rob. So often we're reporting on that happen not because an engineer or materials scientist said "How do I make X happen?", but instead, "what would happen if I did Y?". That also happens a lot in creative cooking which is, after all, another form of chemistry. If there are any cooks reading this, I'm sure they'll understand what I mean.

vimalkumarp
User Rank
Gold
Re: Replacing Gold
vimalkumarp   8/26/2013 6:18:06 AM
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yes i agree with you that since they have come this far  they'll come up with something that is a lot less expensive than the current material.
Let us be optimistic ..!

Elizabeth M
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Blogger
Re: Replacing Gold
Elizabeth M   8/26/2013 6:10:57 AM
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I am with you, far911, they have come this far and I think with a bit of chemistry, they'll come up with something that is a lot less expensive than the current material.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Replacing Gold
Elizabeth M   8/26/2013 6:09:54 AM
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Yes, gold makes the material expensive, but if you noted in the story, it's actually the cheapest ingredient, according to the researcher (if he spoke correctly...maybe he meant most expensive?). I think the researchers have to find a replacement not just for the gold but for other ingredients for this to be viable in the commercial sector.

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