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Ratsky
User Rank
Platinum
Re: A great Regular Feature!
Ratsky   9/9/2013 4:29:10 PM
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MOST of these companies are still around in one form or other!  I was in junior high school in 1958 (and had my ham license by then), and ABSOLUTELY have several of these products in my basement (including all of the varieties of the solder lugs in Slide 1, in one drawer of one of my Akro-Mills cabinets).  Not sure if Walsco is still around; I bought many of their general HW items in little plastic boxes. Despite the "Manufacturing Company" in their name, I suspect they just packaged small quantities of products from OEM suppliers for the hobbyist/service technician market.  At that time, my tastes in reading material included Popular Electronics, Popular Mechanics, QST, CQ, Radio-electronics, and Radio & TV News (later became Electronics World).  I didn't discover the real "trade press" of Engineering until college (1961), when I started working in the industry to pay for my education.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: A great Regular Feature!
William K.   9/5/2013 9:30:11 PM
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Charles, At least one of those companies, Tinnerman, is still alive and I hope doing well. They produce just about every kind of push-on cmechanical onnection thing that can be immagined, and about 78 models that are hard to imagine. I used one of their parts in the angle transducer that I designed that had to live through repeated 50g impacts.

Actually I did recognise most of the names, except for that big fan company.

I thought that was most interesting was the general nature of the items, which is a bit different from what gets front billing today.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: TIME WARP
Cabe Atwell   8/27/2013 2:30:27 PM
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Wow talk about going back in time! I especially like the giant 5hp PC fan.

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
TIME WARP
bobjengr   8/24/2013 1:37:14 PM
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Very interesting post Jennifer.  My wife knows I'm really not a hoarder but I do have several "items" that I feel are definitely "keepers".  My first computer; Commodore 64, my first hand-held calculator; HP 35, my first 8-track tape and tape recorder; Maxell, etc.  You get the picture.  I knew I was old when we visited the "Museum of American History" in Cincinnati and all of my "collectables" were prominently displayed.  Did I ever hear it over that one?  Again--great post.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A great Regular Feature!
Ann R. Thryft   8/21/2013 8:10:44 PM
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Thanks, Jenn, this was a lot of fun. What a different era that was.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A great Regular Feature!
Charles Murray   8/20/2013 6:47:33 PM
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Fantastic slideshow, Jenn. The only company name that I know is still around is Kohler (others may still be inexistence, but I didn't recognize the names). I wonder if readers know about any of the others. And, yes, CCarpenter, I think an occasional "Where is this company now?" feature would be an interesting idea.  

Jennifer Campbell
User Rank
Gold
Re: A great Regular Feature!
Jennifer Campbell   8/20/2013 2:48:28 PM
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Glad you enjoyed it CCarpenter! We plan on making this a regular feature - at least until we run out of archives!

CCarpenter
User Rank
Iron
A great Regular Feature!
CCarpenter   8/20/2013 1:11:01 PM
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I'd urge you to hang onto all you found during your clean-up and give us a regular peek at Design News Past in articles like this.  A follow-up ("Where is this company now?") would be fun too.

Enjoyed the slide show, would enjoy more of the same!

 

D. Sherman
User Rank
Gold
Re: blast from the past
D. Sherman   8/20/2013 10:34:03 AM
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Like you, I grew up reading my dad's hand-me-down trade magazines, mostly Design News. Among other things I remember were all the small ads from what appeared to be one-product companies located in California. Of course there were plenty from New Jersey, and Illinois, but to day it's hard to even imagine Los Angeles as a manufacturing center. Even auto body shops have been forced out of Los Angeles by pollution regulatins.

ragtoplvr
User Rank
Gold
Re: blast from the past
ragtoplvr   8/20/2013 9:10:47 AM
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A rope wrap manual starter.  Love it.  Used to mow, always had the rope tied on the handle of the push mower.  Then  got a lawnboy, with recoil starter,  it even was self propelled.  I thought I was in tall cotton.   Ended up not using it much, because it was too slow.  Mowing up to 3 acre yards with a push mower, sure I wanted a rider, but almost no one had them

 

How times have changed

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