HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 2/2
tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Don't forget to Donate
tekochip   8/14/2013 1:53:48 PM
NO RATINGS
Really it's the same as commercial products; there are good ones and bad ones.  The good news is that when you find a lousy open source product you can just uninstall it, and that means you usually forget all about the negative experience.  There are a few open source tools that are so exceptional, I rely upon them daily, so I too am a convert.
 
Don't forget to donate to the open source products you depend upon.  Just because you got them for free doesn't that they don't have value.


JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Strength in Diversity
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   8/14/2013 12:42:35 PM
NO RATINGS
Good mention about Wikipedia.  That's a resource that I use almost daily; and it's funny I didn't even think of it when pondering past examples.  Just goes to show how comfortable & familiar we get with things.

78RPM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Strength in Diversity
78RPM   8/14/2013 12:36:17 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, JimT I, too, was a skeptic of Open Source at one time. Your Linux example is a good one. Lots of people thought Open Office couldn't work but it has actually worked better as the Libre Open Office broke off from corporate control. Many thought Wikipedia couldn't work. How can you have a credible encyclopedia when anybody is able to edit it? But it keeps getting better. Open Source is kind of like the paradigm of Stone Soup -- or maybe a bee hive.

78RPM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Not suprising
78RPM   8/14/2013 12:28:27 PM
NO RATINGS
Open Source offers a method of rapid prototyping and proof of concept. A problem for companies is how to protect the idea from competition as the low barrier to entry minimizes development effort of similar products. Another problem is that Arduino boards and shields take more 3D space than projects laid out for a specific purpose. The Beagle Bone does minimize this by packing a lot of computing power in a small space if computing power is what you need.

We could see open source in bigger projects. Fisker has tried to open source its component layout though the company is struggling. Didn't I read that Elon Musk has offered his Hyperloop Transport as an open source project? He has provided the dream and the plans and will let others contribute to building it.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Strength in Diversity
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   8/14/2013 12:20:45 PM
NO RATINGS
Wilson, you mentioned, "Traditionally, open-source designing in the commercial space were seen as a risk." You're right, but recognize that the source of that perspective were various Corporate Marketing Strategies, in general.  The perceived "risk" was a loss of potential revenue, and it was broadly viewed that any development efforts not company-controlled, translated to a weaker bottom line.

The first Open-Sourced initiative I ever experienced was the explosion of the Linux OS; which I completely mis-understood at the time.  10 years ago, I considered it sloppy, risky, and just plain 'hacked'.  But time proved me wrong, and it is clear now that allowing any developer, anywhere in the world, on any payroll, from any strategic vantage point, can improve the overall good of the community.

It's the simple concept of Strength in Diversity.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Not suprising
Rob Spiegel   8/14/2013 10:37:09 AM
NO RATINGS
What I find surprising about this, Naperlou, is the percentage of professional engineers who are likely to try open source. for hobbyists and students, cost would certainly be a factor in the choice. For professional engineers, the quality of the open source tools would come more into play.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Not suprising
naperlou   8/14/2013 9:27:20 AM
NO RATINGS
Wilson, this is not such a suprising result.  I was a little suprised on the hardware side, though.  On the other hand, students and hobbyists are not designing to deploy large scale commercial products.  In addition, since the BeagleBone is an ARM processor, it is a good platform to use for learning that CPU family. 

<<  <  Page 2/2


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Samsung's Galaxy line of smartphones used to fare quite well in the repairability department, but last year's flagship S5 model took a tumble, scoring a meh-inducing 5/10. Will the newly redesigned S6 lead us back into star-studded territory, or will we sink further into the depths of a repairability black hole?
Fifteen European research centers have launched EuroCPS to help European companies develop innovative products for the Internet of Things.
Get your Allman Brothers albums ready. The iconic Volkswagen Microbus may be poised for a comeback, and this time it could be electric.
In 2003, the world contained just over 500 million Internet-connected devices. By 2010, this figure had risen to 12.5 billion connected objects, almost six devices per individual with access to the Internet. Now, as we move into 2015, the number of connected 'things' is expected to reach 25 billion, ultimately edging toward 50 billion by the end of the decade.
NASA engineer Brian Trease studied abroad in Japan as a high school student and used to fold fast-food wrappers into cranes using origami techniques he learned in library books. Inspired by this, he began to imagine that origami could be applied to building spacecraft components, particularly solar panels that could one day send solar power from space to be used on earth.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
3/31/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
5/7/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 20 - 24, Taking the Internet of Things to the Cloud
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Proto Labs
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service