HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: informative but not quite useful
Elizabeth M   8/7/2013 7:47:49 AM
NO RATINGS
I just took a look at BlueSign--interesting. It does seem like something that goes way beyond what Nike is doing; you're right, NadineJ. And of course Nike has a vested interest in looking like they're doing something for sustainability and an app like this would raise their profile for people worried about this issue. But it seems like designers would definitely find something like BlueSign way more helpful.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: informative but not quite useful
NadineJ   8/6/2013 3:20:33 PM
NO RATINGS
As I mentioned, it's very informative for anyone who doesn't know much about materials. 

The app does what's it's designed to do.  That's not a flaw.  It gives consumers fun facts while helping Nike's credibility.

Just like organic farming, it's very complicated.  Lots of designers get frustrated.  Luckily, in apparel and footwear, there are new companies, like BlueSign, that help give guidance.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: informative but not quite useful
Elizabeth M   8/6/2013 1:36:45 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for the real-world perspective on this, Nadine. So the app has flaws, I can see that from what you're saying. Do you still think it is a useful resource, in your opinion? Are there a lot of designers out there who don't know a lot about the materials they're using or thinking to use in products?

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
informative but not quite useful
NadineJ   8/6/2013 1:28:52 PM
NO RATINGS
Interesting timing.  I just got that app a few weeks ago.

It is very informative for anyone who doesn't know much about materials.  For example, organic cotton is extremely water intensive and nylon takes over 50yrs to breakdown-if continuously exposed to sunlight (most landfills are underground).  The app ranks down feathers very highly across many categories (energy, organic, etc).  Anyone who's ever seen a video of how goose down is harvested would disagree.  Typically, it's live-plucked.  There's nothing "eco" about that.

It's nice PR for Nike to give consumers more info.  But, designers and manufacturers need a good source of dynamic info in order to create products that are truly sustainable.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A great start
Elizabeth M   8/6/2013 9:36:21 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes, Chuck, I think it is and will be useful. But as Ann points out, there is a lot more that can be done, I'm sure, and more materials that can be listed. I don't know Nike's plans at this point; it would be something I'd have to look into. But surely it would be very useful if they would continue to add materials to the list and the app.

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
App for everything
Mydesign   8/5/2013 11:56:14 PM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
Elizabeth, now it's the time for an App for everything. So there is no wonder that such apps can be used in all areas of our day to day personal life and at enterprise level. There is no doubt that apps can increase the productivity, accountability, tracking, monitoring and even creativity at enterprise level

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A great start
Charles Murray   8/5/2013 7:10:05 PM
NO RATINGS
Great post and a great idea -- one that should be useful for a lot of our readers.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
A great start
Ann R. Thryft   8/5/2013 1:01:24 PM
NO RATINGS
This is a great idea, and a great start. 75,000 sounds like an impressive number, but there are many, many materials Nike doesn't use in its products. What classes of materials are included? For example, what kinds of plastics and rubber? Any metals? And is there any intention, by Nike or another entity, of expanding this to include whatever categories aren't at present?



Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
You know you're an engineer if you chuckle whenever anyone says "centrifugal force," or you find yourself at the airport studying the baggage handling equipment.
The word “smart” is becoming the dumbest word around. It has been applied to almost every device and system in our homes. In addition to smartphones and smart meters, we now hear about smart clothing and smart shoes, smart lights, smart homes, smart buildings, and every trendy city today has its smart city project. Just because it has a computer inside and is connected to the Web, does not mean it is smart.
Are you being paid enough? Do you want a better job? According to a recent survey Manpower released just before Engineers Week, employers and engineers don't see eye-to-eye about the state of US engineers' skills and experience.
On Feb. 6, UMass Amherst announced that it would no longer be accepting Iranian graduate students in STEM fields. It has since abandoned that policy.
Two issues have been the bane of the plastics industry for as long as one can remember: The ban on plastic grocery bags and whether the use of bisphenol A (BPA) in plastics such as polycarbonate and PVC is harmful to humans.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Feb 23 - 27, Baremetal C Programming for Embedded Systems
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service