HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 3/3
Jim_E
User Rank
Platinum
I'm trying to avoid them....
Jim_E   8/6/2013 9:22:12 AM
While our cell phones, laptops and tables have them, I'm trying to avoid Lithium-Ion batteries elsewhere.  I'm a bit of a LED flashlight junkie, but I've avoided any that take the more powerful 18650 and 14500 Lithium-Ion batteries after reading about over-charging and over-discharging fires!

I'd love to have the extra power, but it's not worth the risk for me, especially if I can't just charge the things unattended.  Maybe I just need to build a concrete charging hood and place it on my granite countertops....

I'll just stick to AA and AAA for now until something better comes along that doesn't have the propensity to explode and catch fire.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: lithium-ion battrey fires
Charles Murray   8/5/2013 6:23:48 PM
NO RATINGS
Up to now, the problem has been one of underestimating the potential overheating issues involving lithium-ion, Gorksi. This is a trap that has snared a few engineers. Better testing methods, particularly those that consider internal shorts, should help. The question is how many of the makers of big li-ion battery packs -- like those used in autos and aircraft -- will take advantage of this.  

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Suprised UL is not already involved
Charles Murray   8/5/2013 6:16:24 PM
NO RATINGS
Naperlou, UL previously had standards covering battery packs for portable applications using all kinds of cell chemistries, including lithium-ion. What's new here is that UL is creating an internal short circuit test method for inclusion in the lithium battery safety standardc UL 1642. This addresses the problem that has been written about a lot -- internal short circuits related to separator failure.  

Gorski
User Rank
Platinum
lithium-ion battrey fires
Gorski   8/5/2013 3:50:47 PM
NO RATINGS
Since there have been a spate of lithium-ion battery fires lately, I was surprised that UL is just now geting into the act. The overheating must have shown up before. Every battry made until now has not been perfect. Who was hiding this overheating problem, and why?

Gorski
User Rank
Platinum
lithium-ion battrey fires
Gorski   8/5/2013 3:50:37 PM
Since there have been a spate of lithium-ion battery fires lately, I was surprised that UL is just now geting into the act. The overheating must have shown up before. Every battry made until now has not been perfect. Who was hiding this overheating problem, and why?

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Suprised UL is not already involved
naperlou   8/5/2013 9:15:35 AM
Chuvk, frankly, I am suprised that UL has not been involved in lithium-ion battery certification before now.  It seems that we have to have problems before it is decided that it would be good to have a third party certification.  With laptop batteries it took fire in some Apple laptops to get this going.  With cars and planes, again it seems that we needed fires before this was done.  Considering that the volatility of the chemistry was known at the start, this seems short sighted.

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
A Good Vent
tekochip   8/5/2013 9:03:06 AM
Having recently been injured by a lithium battery explosion, I think a good vent
is important in the cell.  These cells build up pressure so rapidly that there
needs to be a means of safely releasing the pressure safely, not explosively.

<<  <  Page 3/3


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
The promise of the Internet of Things (IoT) is that devices, gadgets, and appliances we use every day will be able to communicate with one another. This potential is not limited to household items or smartphones, but also things we find in our yard and garden, as evidenced by a recent challenge from the element14 design community.
Researchers have developed a new flexible fabric that integrates both movement and sensors, introducing new potential for technology-embedded clothing and soft robots.
Made by Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
If you didn't realize that PowerPoint presentations are inherently hilarious, you have to see Don McMillan take one apart. McMillan -- aka the Technically Funny Comic -- worked for 10 years as an engineer before he switched to stand-up comedy.
The first Tacoma Narrows Bridge was a Washington State suspension bridge that opened in 1940 and spanned the Tacoma Narrows strait of Puget Sound between Tacoma and the Kitsap Peninsula. It opened to traffic on July 1, 1940, and dramatically collapsed into Puget Sound on November 7, just four months after it opened.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Dec 1 - 5, An Introduction to Embedded Software Architecture and Design
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service