HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 2/5  >  >>
Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Too many features, not enough knobs
Charles Murray   8/7/2013 8:48:06 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree, Ann. Too many problems with voice recognition. Because I'm a lousy typist, I once tried a voice-type system. It didn't work out well. See the link below from 2000, describing my problems with it.

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=215375

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Too many features, not enough knobs
Ann R. Thryft   8/7/2013 2:08:58 PM
NO RATINGS
TunaFish#5, ha ha. I totally agree. It's the financial services companies and utilities' IVR systems that annoy me the most. Some of them have gotten worse in their ability to recognize what you're saying. But I think a lot of the issue is how they're being deployed, in automated systems to deal with the non-exception cases. For some reason, my problems are usually the exception case that require a human.

TunaFish#5
User Rank
Gold
Re: Too many features, not enough knobs
TunaFish#5   8/7/2013 1:29:10 PM
@Amclaussen

Looks like you & I are cut from the same cloth.

Also, you've opened up 2 threads that could really go places even outside the current context of auto design:

"green" pretentions - more and more green-ness is a euphamism for reducing cost &/or services

People is being mesmerized by stupid non-sense "technology" - what are the top websites on the internet nowadays?  What's the main content to/from cell phones?

TunaFish#5
User Rank
Gold
Re: Too many features, not enough knobs
TunaFish#5   8/7/2013 1:20:49 PM
NO RATINGS
OK, Ann, you're right.  You got me.

On the other hand, when IVR (interactive voice recognition) (phone answering & call directing) systems get to a point where they maintain (or even lower) a caller's blood pressure, instead of raising it, I'll be happy to continue this conversation.

Ironically,

(1) I run into these most often with my health insurance company.

(2) these things seem to have gotten worse, not better, in recent years.

 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Too many features, not enough knobs
Ann R. Thryft   8/7/2013 11:58:51 AM
NO RATINGS
TunaFish#5, I heard all about those, but that's not voice control. I don't want a car that *talks* to me--I want a car that *listens* to me. That's voice control.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Too many features, not enough knobs
Ann R. Thryft   8/7/2013 11:57:21 AM
NO RATINGS
rickgtoc, I can see a ton of problems with voice control, too. But at least you don 't have to take your eyes off the road to operate things.

Amclaussen
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Too many features, not enough knobs
Amclaussen   8/7/2013 11:43:54 AM
That's not being "Curmudgeon" at all... That's is plain old simple common sense.

People is being mesmerized by stupid non-sense "technology" and ends up buying cars that are much more difficult to repair, maintain and operate, and that become disposable soon.

It is absurd that inside this overzealous storm of "green" pretentions, the market is heading towards even stupider designs to satisfy stupider consumers.

Here in Mexico, recent models of almost new Ford midsize cars, infested with so called "electronic wizardry" have been filling dealers shops for under warranty repairs, that most dealerships are not able to fix easily or timely.

A sane measure would be to actually measure distraction time when people look away from the road, and proceed against manufacturers that are infesting vehicles with distraction causing devices.  One friend of mine, that happens to work at a large manufacturer of automotive goods (Goodyear hoses and belts), suffered an ugly accident when a distracted driver invaded his lane heading in opposite direction when the driver was "adjusting" the vehicle's touchscreen entertainment system.

Fortunately, the collision was at a very low speed, but enough to deploy the airbag in the Nissan March of my friend, Interestingly, that caused him MORE damage than otherwise (he suffered cervical injuries, serious skin burns on his face and a broken nose.  Apparently, the airbag deployment was excessively powerful for his body weight and size.

The surgeon that treated him declared the injuries were definitely caused by the airbag and not the crash itself.  So much for "too advanced car technology".

TunaFish#5
User Rank
Gold
Re: Too many features, not enough knobs
TunaFish#5   8/7/2013 10:11:54 AM
NO RATINGS
@rickgtoc

oooh, scary:  voice operated car with my wife riding shotgun?!?!

I'll have to keep extra fuses for the car's voice control circuit in the glove compartment!

Or not:  I'll just let it die its wretched death and be done.

TunaFish#5
User Rank
Gold
Re: More than annoyance, a safety matter too.
TunaFish#5   8/7/2013 10:09:00 AM
@Amclaussen

I'm with you, as my Mazda 5 has both hard-to-fathom HVAC controls *and* driver-side-only key lock.

Mazda, However, acheived their HVAC control opacity through oblique logic of knob+button interaction. They didn't need the additional investment of a whizbang LCD touchscreen interface.

 

If, though, you want to complain about technology introducing safety risk, let's discuss power windows.   How is one to get out of a car wreck with a "down" electrical system and accessible doors sufficiently undamaged yet held shut by debris?

Slightly obscure?  Yeah, I guess.

Safety reduction?  Clearly.

Who seeks, accepts & buys cars like this?  um,.... me, you, everybody.

TunaFish#5
User Rank
Gold
Re: Too many features, not enough knobs
TunaFish#5   8/7/2013 9:57:42 AM
@Ann Thryft

> Maybe voice controls make more sense.

That-has-to-be-where-we're-going-but....

I remember with bemused annoyance at Lee Iacoca's Chrysler K car's perpetual announcements:

A door is a jar!

Stupid car:  it's not a jar!  it's a door!

(OK, it really said, "ajar," but who even uses that word in daily parlance?)

Voice control will just open up a new can of worms with more opportunity (reason) for higher cost.

Curmudgeonly yours!

<<  <  Page 2/5  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Conventional wisdom holds that MIT, Cal Tech, and Stanford are three of the country’s best undergraduate engineering schools. Unfortunately, when conventional wisdom visits the topic of best engineering schools, it too often leaves out some of the most distinguished programs that don’t happen to offer PhD-level degrees.
Sherlock Ohms highlights stories told by engineers who have used their deductive reasoning and technical prowess to troubleshoot and solve the most perplexing engineering mysteries.
Airbus Defence and Space has 3D printed titanium brackets for communications satellites. The redesigned, one-piece 3D-printed brackets have better thermal resistance than conventionally manufactured parts, can be produced faster, cost 20% less, and save about 1 kg of weight per satellite.
A group of researchers at the Seoul National University have discovered a way to take material from cigarette butts and turn it into a carbon-based material that’s ideal for storing energy and creating a powerful supercapacitor.
Hacking has a long history in the movies, beginning with Tron and War Games and continuing through The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Sep 22 - 26, MCU Software Development – A Step-by-Step Guide (Using a Real Eval Board)
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service