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Charles Murray
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RFID sensors?
Charles Murray   8/1/2013 6:52:20 PM
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Karen, when I drive through western Illinois, I often see cows with big yellow tags attached to their ears. I've always assumed those were some kind of RFID devices that enable the cow to be identified by feeding devices. Reading your article, though, I'm now wondering if those yellow tags use MEMS sensors, or if those are actually the MooMonitors. And if they are MooMonitors, why do some cows wear them around their necks while others have them on the ear?

Brian Fuller
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Re: RFID sensors?
Brian Fuller   8/2/2013 12:21:14 PM
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Chuck, I've always thought those devices were so the cows could listen to Cubs games. 

Karen Lightman
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Blogger
Re: RFID sensors?
Karen Lightman   8/7/2013 12:09:54 PM
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Oh Charles and Brian - 

I am glad that you've taken away the most important part of my blog - that cows are awesome and should be taken more seriously by design engineers. 

Right?

Not exactly the response I was going for. So let's dig for more, shall we?

Given your interests, Brian, how can we use MEMS to increase ways that you can enhance your ability to enjoy Cubs Games? Perhaps an Augmented/Virtual Reality headset (or body suit - think big!) outfitted with MEMS that can simulate your experience at a Cubs Game. You can sense (touch, smell, hear, see, etc.) the game as though you were there thanks to the enabling characteristics of MEMS woven into the fabric of your wearable-sensor-embedded Cubs outfiit and cap.

The only issue: are there enough Cubs fans out there to support a market for such a product?

 

let's discuss...

 

Karen Lightman
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Blogger
Re: RFID sensors?
Karen Lightman   8/7/2013 12:14:17 PM
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P.S. I am a loyal Pittsburgh Pirates fan - the Bucco's are now in 1st place, National League Central

AnandY
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Gold
RE: Thinking outside the mobile ‘box’
AnandY   8/8/2013 3:25:50 AM
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I agree with Karen in that the use of the MEMS accelerometer in MooMonitors can serve to be of immense benefits to the dairy cow farmer. The farmer can effectively determine the peak fertility of the cow and reap immense profits from the products got during the peak season.

AnandY
User Rank
Gold
RE: THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOX
AnandY   8/11/2013 3:57:42 AM
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It is no doubt that the moomonitor will revolutionize the way in which dairy cattle are managed. In fact the ability of the moomonitor to tell when a cow has reached peaked fertility and is ready for reproduction will reduce the likelihood of many farmers enhancing better use of the artificial inseminators well. It will also usher in a new digital age in the farming business in a manner that has never been tried before

Karen Lightman
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Blogger
RE: THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOX
Karen Lightman   8/22/2013 2:37:53 PM
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Thanks @AnandY for your comments. I know everyone is laughing when they hear "MooMonitor" but it's actually a huge deal for the dairy business and can be applied for any other type of animal husbandry for business. I would love to see - hear and read about more creative uses of MEMS and sensor technology that is not going to be featured at CES. And yes, will be featured at the Amway Feedstore! :) 



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