HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 2/2
AREV
User Rank
Gold
Re: DC Bus Voltage
AREV   8/2/2013 1:54:44 PM
NO RATINGS
This articel sounds like the cubic inch battles of the 60s.(Watch the disney movie Dumbo from the 40s and watch the drunk clown scene.) Sunco was kept in business since the Covettes required the 260 blend . . . . I lost count of the volatge on thedifferent cars. This means that battery makers cannot standardize. I'd like discussion on the safety factor. I have hears or the Pintos w/ fork truck batteriies having a short and the entire car tourched in seconds from a short(wrench dropped). Are we going to wait until one death from these vehicle w/ no concern to isolate the power from the rest of the vehicle? With this much electrical power they may be the next vehicle of choise for terrorists. Just like bigger planes became bombs on 9-11. Less weight. Less power. More safety.

 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: DC Bus Voltage
Charles Murray   8/1/2013 7:37:10 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for that info, TJ. A few years ago, we wrote about how EV drag racers first tried to use smaller motors and lower voltages, and how they evolved. You might enjoy it:

http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=228440

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Let's evolve
Charles Murray   8/1/2013 6:44:44 PM
NO RATINGS
Essentially, Rob, you're asking how much more all-electric range can you get by employing a higher-voltage architecture? Higher-voltage architectures and higher-voltage batteries are in general better at capturing regenerative braking energy, which does get you some extra electric range. But putting a number on it is going to be tough. I'll try to get a rough estimate for you, but it will vary from vehicle to vehicle, since they have different electrical architectures. Great question.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Let's evolve
Rob Spiegel   8/1/2013 11:04:33 AM
NO RATINGS
Hey Chuck, how does the greater voltage affect how long the car can go before it needs to switch to a fuel motor?

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
DC Bus Voltage
TJ McDermott   8/1/2013 11:03:28 AM
NO RATINGS
The voltages noted in the article match the DC bus voltage one would find in an industrial Variable Frequency Drive.  Using just the converter portion of such a drive would permit the use of regular 220V AC motors on the 300-360 voltages, and 460V AC motors for those in the 650V bus range.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Let's evolve
naperlou   8/1/2013 10:24:03 AM
NO RATINGS
Cap'n, this is an interesting trend.  The 48V systems are an interesting bridge.  As more functions are powered by electricity provided by batteries, the load on the engine is lessened.  This allows smaller (more fuel efficient) engines to power the vehicle.  Charging the batteries using regenerative braking captures energy that was unused before.  Thanks for the article.

<<  <  Page 2/2


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Researchers in Canada have developed a chin strap that harvests energy from chewing and can potentially power a digital earplug that can provide both protection and communication capabilities.
In case you haven't heard, the deadline to enter the 2014 Golden Mousetrap Awards is coming up fast Oct. 28! Have you entered yet?
Made by Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
A Tokyo company, Miraisens Inc., has unveiled a device that allows users to move virtual 3D objects around and "feel" them via a vibration sensor. The device has many applications within the gaming, medical, and 3D-printing industries.
In the last few years, use of CFD in building design has increased manifolds. Computational fluid dynamics is effective in analyzing the flow and thermal properties of air within spaces. It can be used in buildings to find the best measures for comfortable temperature at low energy use.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: October 1 - 30
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service