HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Page 1/2  >  >>
vimalkumarp
User Rank
Gold
Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
vimalkumarp   8/7/2013 7:55:04 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes , i understand what you mean. Sometimes innovations do need some push to gather momentum and there is nothing better than support from NASA.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
Elizabeth M   8/7/2013 7:49:24 AM
NO RATINGS
3D printing already is taking off in so many ways, that I imagine NASA will just give it more of a boost(er). Sorry, I couldn't resist the pun opportunities! :)

vimalkumarp
User Rank
Gold
Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
vimalkumarp   8/7/2013 1:23:34 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes Elizabeth, you are spot on with the observation that NASA's investment in it will set a good precedent.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
Elizabeth M   8/6/2013 9:27:58 AM
NO RATINGS
Exactly, vimalkumarp, and NASA's investment in it will set a good precedent and hopefully inspire the commercial sector.

vimalkumarp
User Rank
Gold
Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
vimalkumarp   8/1/2013 9:42:51 AM
NO RATINGS
Your point that NASA has had a hand in developing a lot of technologies that benefit the world, not just the space agency is spot on. I am sure 3D printing has a bright future..

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
Elizabeth M   8/1/2013 8:07:32 AM
NO RATINGS
Indeed, vimalkumarp, NASA has had a hand in developing a lot of technologies that benefit the world, not just the space agency. With NASA innovating this way it makes sense that commercial technology will follow suit. This really holds a lot of promise for the rapid evolution of 3D printing, I think.

vimalkumarp
User Rank
Gold
Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
vimalkumarp   8/1/2013 2:22:00 AM
NO RATINGS
it is incredible that a rocket engine was fabricated this way.  the most important point that i feel is that if you analyse the technology evolution, space technology has always been a pioneer. So any advancement in space will cause ripples in other domain and this is good for having solutions that will enhance quality of life. Thanks a lot Cabe for the blog.

a.saji
User Rank
Silver
Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
a.saji   7/31/2013 10:47:43 PM
NO RATINGS
@Shehan: Indeed and that shows the development of the technology itself. The technology has come a long way and the signs of improvement are visible now.

78RPM
User Rank
Gold
Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
78RPM   7/31/2013 10:36:50 PM
NO RATINGS
Oh, shehan, I meant to direct my previous comment to you.

78RPM
User Rank
Gold
Re: No surprise, but still pretty innovative
78RPM   7/31/2013 10:34:11 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, Elizabeth. My Montana kitchen imitates a time when someone just mixed a bunch of blue minerals (chromium ?) to get a color to add to the whitewash/lime. But, yes we have gone beyond Pantone color match at the hardware store to get to other world / artificial reality.  I like your comment because it is close to home.

Page 1/2  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Altair has released an update of its HyperWorks computer-aided engineering simulation suite that includes new features focusing on four key areas of product design: performance optimization, lightweight design, lead-time reduction, and new technologies.
At IMTS last week, Stratasys introduced two new multi-materials PolyJet 3D printers, plus a new UV-resistant material for its FDM production 3D printers. They can be used in making jigs and fixtures, as well as prototypes and small runs of production parts.
In a line of ultra-futuristic projects, DARPA is developing a brain microchip that will help heal the bodies and minds of soldiers. A final product is far off, but preliminary chips are already being tested.
If you're planning to develop a product that uses a microcontroller, you'll want to take note of next week's Design News Continuing Education course, "MCU Software Development A Step-by-Step Guide."
Watch BMW's newest electric car, the i3, being charged with an everyday Home Depot-rented, gas-powered generator.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Sep 22 - 26, MCU Software Development A Step-by-Step Guide (Using a Real Eval Board)
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service