HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/5  >  >>
Tool_maker
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Control knobs
Tool_maker   8/9/2013 8:32:56 PM
NO RATINGS
@tekochip: I knew sooner or later that somewhere in any problem is a government regulation, issued by a government agency full of bureaucrats. Thank you for pointing it out.

To an earlier poster who stated that stainless steel corrodes in salt water is too simplistic to be taken at face value. There are many grades of stainless and some will stand up better than others. A simple test is just to try a magnet on it. If the magnet will attract, that stainless has a higher percentage of iron, and will corrode faster. Chances are it can also be heattreated and be more wear resistant. The higher the nickle and various other alloy contents are, the less likely to corrode, but it will probably be more ductile.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Just a bunch of good ole boys
Rob Spiegel   8/9/2013 9:52:51 AM
NO RATINGS
Chuck, we're seeing a lot of these stories. I would guess that for every one of these stories, there are hundreds, even thousands of consumers who are having the same problem. You'd think we'd hear more about it.

jmiller
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Just a bunch of good ole boys
jmiller   7/28/2013 4:03:36 PM
NO RATINGS
I hope the screen lasts for you.  I prefer the buttons as well.  I can take it apart and fix it if I need too.  Can't do much with a bad screen.

jmiller
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Just a bunch of good ole boys
jmiller   7/28/2013 4:01:28 PM
NO RATINGS
I enjoyed this ariticle.  Washer and dryer hinges are quite interesting when you look at all of the different types and models out there.  I love the way you dug into it and fixed it. 

notarboca
User Rank
Gold
Re: Just a bunch of good ole boys
notarboca   7/26/2013 10:05:56 PM
NO RATINGS
Oldjimh--as long as there are good ole boys, tools, and problems to solve, nobody is ever out of the picture.  Where I used to work, all you had to do was open your car hood (for any reason) and 5-6 guys would gather and see if there was anything that needed fixing.  Ah, good old ingenuity!

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Just a bunch of good ole boys
Charles Murray   7/26/2013 5:25:45 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for the info, oldjimh. We have a lot of smart-resourceful readers of Design News. Those who don't already know this will appreciate the information.

oldjimh
User Rank
Silver
Re: Just a bunch of good ole boys
oldjimh   7/26/2013 1:28:38 PM
NO RATINGS
@ Rob and Charles

Thanks for your kind words.

The inexpensive OBD code readers from Sears et al are okay ofr us shade tree machanics. Take a look at them.  The cheap ones won't read ABS codes though.

People fluent with computers can buy a USB device that interfaces a laptop to the disgnostic port below steering column, same place you plug in the little hand-held unit.

To overcome initial fear - most auto parts stores(Oreilly,  Autozone etc) will let you use theirs in the parking lot. My local Oreily's loaner does read ABS.

Re foreign autos :  i owned one Toyota and swore off them as soon as i received the 'factory' shop manual.  It was pitifully lacking in detail and illustrations ,  practically useless.  Perhaps 3/4 inch thick. By comparison i have a 6 inch stack of genuine Ford manuals for the Escort i mentioned earlier.  They have marvelous drawings, wiring diagrams and step by step troubleshooting procedures. 

 

That old '68 truck IS a delight to work on.  To service the distributor and fuel pump I climbed inside the fenderwell.  You can stand next to the engine in the shade of the hood with your feet flat on the ground.. I found genuine Ford shop manuals on Ebay.  It should be the last vehicle i'll ever have to buy. And it turns more heads than a new one !

 

old jim hardy

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Just a bunch of good ole boys
Rob Spiegel   7/25/2013 9:04:26 PM
NO RATINGS
It sounds like some of it is coming down in price if you can get a read-out on your engine light with a $50 to $100 piece of equipment. 

For a lot of it though, it's probably trapped by the same economics of medical equipment -- complex equipment for a limited market.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Just a bunch of good ole boys
Charles Murray   7/25/2013 8:59:02 PM
NO RATINGS
I do wonder sometimes, though, Rob, why they can't bring the size and price of the garage equipment down. Everything else in electronics continues to get smaller and cheaper. It would be nice if they could make a low-cost home version.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Just a bunch of good ole boys
Rob Spiegel   7/25/2013 8:57:42 PM
NO RATINGS
Ah, man, OldJimH, that Ford pickup will be fun to work on. Tons of elbow room under the hood. That takes me back to my Detroit days when my grandfather was a Ford executive, my Dad worked in marketing for Vicker's, a hydraulics system producer, and I worked in an automotive paint lab. Back then, if you grew up in the Detroit area, good jobs grew on trees. For those who came in from the outside, jobs were not quite as plentiful, but there was still a lot of good work to go around. That started changing in the 70s with OPEC boycotts and great small Japanese cars. Fellow Detroiters did not look kindly on those who bought Japanese cars. The view was that if you bought a foreign car, you were depriving your neighbor of a job.

Page 1/5  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
In this new Design News feature, "How it Works," we’re starting off by examining the inner workings of the electronic cigarette. While e-cigarettes seemed like a gimmick just two or three years ago, they’re catching fire -- so to speak. Sales topped $1 billion last year and are set to hit $10 billion by 2017. Cigarette companies are fighting back by buying up e-cigarette manufacturers.
Microchip recently released the 3D TouchPad, the first USB PC Peripheral device that couples 2D multi-touch input with 3D air gesture technology. The company seeks the help of developers to further enhance the capabilities of the technology.
Made by Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
To give engineers a better idea of the range of resins and polymers available as alternatives to other materials, this Technology Roundup presents several articles on engineering plastics that can do the job.
Mac Cameron of Stratasys describes the company’s Connex3 technology, which allows users to 3D-print complex parts in one build with no assembly required.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11-11/13 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service