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AnandY
User Rank
Gold
Re-WiSee
AnandY   7/26/2013 6:08:47 AM
NO RATINGS
The conception of the technology is a bit rushed, people are still struggling to adapt the touch sensitive screens and so this new gesture might have to wait till people are fed up with the touch sensitive one. More so I don't see any necessity of the technology especially in work places were conservation calls the shots.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: surveillance potential?
William K.   7/25/2013 10:27:29 PM
NO RATINGS
If the gesture sensing is strictly a fast depth sensor plus position detection, then it will be wrong very often for soem folks who don't match the model, like me. So it will be wrong most of the time.

As for collecting and mining the data, I am cerain that a heard of weaseles is already working on that part, in order to sell marketing information. But that will need to have context added to the selections in order to be really effective. At that point there would be no more privacy available. The only solutions are to lie constantly or to disconnect. So now we have a moral question: "is it right to mislead internet snoops?" That could be an interesting challenge.

paulomuggler
User Rank
Iron
surveillance potential?
paulomuggler   7/25/2013 12:19:52 PM
NO RATINGS
Does anyone else think there is a huge potential for undesired surveillance with this kind of technology? Could this not be used to build huge databases to be mined for marketing, or other, more nefarious, purposes?

As a side note, the Kinect is not a gesture recognition technology per se, it is a glorified depth-sensing camera. The gesture recognition technology is in the computer vision algorithms running over the depth annotated images.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Gesture3 recognition: A dumb idea, no matter how cool
William K.   7/18/2013 9:02:10 PM
NO RATINGS
The whole concept of computer gesture recognition smells a lot like a few programers wanting to show off how smart they are, and how they can create something really new. But the actual value added will not be very much, and the harm done by forcing a lot of people to think even more like the minions of Mr. Gates will take a while to become apparant. We will have the computers getting things wrong even more often and in no time things will be produced that have no other method of control except for some gestures invented by a bunch of programmers. 

So is it OK to do something just to prove that it can be done, and show folks how smart you are, without delivering any actual value? In simpler words, " just because you can, does that mean that you should?"

far911
User Rank
Silver
Re: Ask me for anything but time
far911   7/18/2013 6:09:13 AM
NO RATINGS
@TJ McDermott - Well said. The time to adapt such technology will take a while and expect a lot of initial resistance from the working people. Most of the stuff in the lab gets replaced by the new stuff that gets made in the lab. Most of it never hits wide spread usage. 

far911
User Rank
Silver
Re: WiSee
far911   7/18/2013 6:07:07 AM
NO RATINGS
@Charles - I think that's debatable. There's too many people who still haven't had any interaction with touch and gesture-based input. It'll be quite some time before keyboards and mice are completely put out of the equation. 

far911
User Rank
Silver
Re: WiSee
far911   7/18/2013 5:58:03 AM
NO RATINGS
This is fascinating stuff and gives realization to the stuff we've seen in Sci-Fi movies like Minority Report etc. Although I am a bit concerned about the departure from mechanic interaction to gesture recognition. I think there are undiscovered implications of this. I hope I'm wrong though. 

a.saji
User Rank
Silver
Re: WiSee
a.saji   7/18/2013 4:58:01 AM
NO RATINGS
@Charles: Do you really think so ? What will replace the two if so ? Do you think AI can play a big role in the future to replace the 2 ?      

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Ask me for anything but time
TJ McDermott   7/18/2013 12:40:23 AM
NO RATINGS
Cabe, this is really cool stuff!

The problem I see is not with the the technology, but the time it takes to bring something like this to market.  Before this can make inroads in the market, someone will have "taken it to the next level" again, and the cycle starts anew.

One cannot stand still, but the pace is so fast now cool ideas stay just that - ideas.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: WiSee
Charles Murray   7/17/2013 7:20:07 PM
NO RATINGS
Nice story, Cabe. In another decade or so, the only way we'll be able to see a keyboard and mouse is in a computer museum, right next to the Commodore 64.

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