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Jim_E
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Good sounding Pontiacs
Jim_E   9/6/2013 3:55:00 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes Keldawwg, I'm aware that Holden made the G8 as well as the new GTO.  I believe that they are also making the new Chevy SS, but that's a bit expensive for me, and I really liked the Pontiac brand.

When I was in high school, my friends had some big Mopars and they were impressive.  My friend's 68 Super Bee (440, 4-speed) could lift the right front wheel off of the ground with three of us in the car!  It had a stoudt motor built before he got it, including a solid cam. 

I still want to buy a G8.

Keldawwg
User Rank
Gold
Re: Good sounding Pontiacs
Keldawwg   9/6/2013 3:42:40 PM
NO RATINGS
You do know that the G8 was not built by Pontiac... It was built by Holden, GM's Australian subsidiary...

My first car was a 1968 Dodge Charger RT, with a 440 Magnum... My best friend had a GTX with the 440 Tri-Power, and he could never get the carbs working right. I got his Tri-Power setup by taking my Holley 4 barrel double pumper off my Dodge and putting it in his car...

I got the carbs working perfectly... 1200 CFM worth of carbs, really pulled hard from 60 to 120 mph... It made a really cool sound, too... The downside was the gas gauge would drop nearly as fast as the speedometer went up... Gas had just gone over $1 a gallon...

deejayh
User Rank
Silver
Re: A less ubiquitous 9V connector
deejayh   8/2/2013 12:20:00 PM
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I thought that my original write up was clear in stating that the battery had to be pushed toward the contacts to engage the battery snaps.  This remote did NOT have the spring type connections.

dbell5
User Rank
Platinum
A less ubiquitous 9V connector
dbell5   7/30/2013 4:46:23 PM
NO RATINGS
There's been a lot of discussion on the battery connector options, but if this one came up, I must have missed it:

I'm partial to a snug fitting battery compartment with NON-snap terminals.

Flat spring contacts, constrained in one wide and one narrow "box" make for a reliable connection, no difficult snaps, no hanging (and usually very fragile) wires, and no way to insert the battery reversed in polarity. The only remaining user issue is getting the old battery out, and that has been solved for decades, with a nylon ribbon that lies under the battery...

 

Larry M
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Shouldn't remotes be easy?
Larry M   7/24/2013 3:08:11 PM
NO RATINGS
Loadster wrote "Be able to divest the responsibility to a sub-contractor who is short-term, low-overhead and ahallow pockets."

A subcontractor probably did this design, but not for the reason you suppose. Most companies subcontract design and procurement of remotes to two or three companies in Taiwan who specialize in this field. It's especially true for companies whose expertise lies elsewhere, e.g., stair lift copanies with expertise in structure and motive power.

These compaines will design a remote with as little a spec as number of buttons and labelling therof. If that's all you provide, they will use an existing design that requires the least modification, to provide the lowerst bid. If the stair lift buyer didn't specify usability or accessibility, he won't get any.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Shouldn't remotes be easy?
Rob Spiegel   7/19/2013 5:55:12 PM
NO RATINGS
Now that's funny, Tool_maker. If there is such a thing as a smart mistake, I've made a ton of them. In reality, my mistakes have been out of ignorance (fair enough for trying) and stupidity -- repeating a mistake when I should know better.

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Shouldn't remotes be easy?
bobjengr   7/19/2013 10:54:59 AM
NO RATINGS
Hello Battar.    What I failed to state-- I am 71, a graduate engineer, registered in the state of Tennessee and even though being the caregiver, I even have problems with various mechanisms AND sometimes the instructions detailing how these devices work or should work.  (Maybe I need a caregiver myself.). My point was, every engineer should have the luxury of time to "try out" the device with end users prior to product launch.  For consumer products, you have how the product was designed to be used and then you have those "off- the-wall" circumstances brought about (in this case) by an aging population.   Also--this is NOT the EU.  Just a thought.  

loadster
User Rank
Gold
Re: Shouldn't remotes be easy?
loadster   7/16/2013 2:02:29 PM
NO RATINGS
I have another vision of the scenario of a poor remote design. Not stupid, not a mistake. But lawyerly. You have a high liability item like a stair lift for the gravity challenged. Ask any lawyer what way can a lift manufacturer shed some of that liability. Be able to divest the responsibility to a sub-contractor who is short-term, low-overhead and ahallow pockets. The controls guys. If there's any way to redirect culpability, they are the scapegoats. So if the fail-safe brakes on the unit don't safely fail, sue the remote guys. So they farmed it out. And the requirements were lax so they got  a good price. My advice, go find yourself some lithium 10 year nine volt batteries they make for smoke alarms. Then they won't leak, bulge or need replacement soon. And as long as the remote isn't high-drain, you won't have to fuss with that little ribbon or a specialty pry bar to release those batteries routinely. But now I"m liable with the recommendation if those batteries fail and leave somebody in the lurch upstairs. BTW, there are pages written about the acoustic recordings they did for Bullitt and the fastback mustang and charger race thru San Francisco. Tough duty on those undercarriages, that. I was always partial to the race up Manhattan and out the Palisade Parkway in the Seven-ups. Those were the days of my yute.

Battar
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Shouldn't remotes be easy?
Battar   7/16/2013 5:12:20 AM
NO RATINGS
Bob,

        You missed the point. You, the caregiver, are the audience. You are the one who is expected to read the instructions and replace the battery. If you read the instructions carefully you will probably find that they include a line saying "this device should not be used by children or by people with diminished abilities without supervision" or something like that. It's required by law in the EU.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Shouldn't remotes be easy?
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   7/15/2013 4:47:46 PM
NO RATINGS
Rob- I would bet money on your guess.  Often, I've seen stupidity in designs from a simple lack of ergonomic forethought; which later was embraced by marketing as models for post-sale recurring revenue.  Started as stupid; grew into manipulative.  All the wrong adjectives, is you ask me.

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