HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 4/4
wbswenberg
User Rank
Gold
Courting the Wife & fixing her MG Midget
wbswenberg   7/4/2013 11:34:26 AM
NO RATINGS
If I was not fixing the gril friends Midget I was pushing it cause I would forget the head lights.  What a bonding.  I rebult the engine and had problems with the bolts strattling the intake and exhaust manifolds.  As a result they leaked air.  The very best it ever ran.  

There was pan under the carb.  Perhaps as a heat shield but aslo as a drip pan for gas which leaked from a plug on the botton of the bowl.  Peratex fixed that.  Then later when the pan broke it did matter.

The wife change oil and add oil based on the oil pressure.  I had to explane the real purpose of the oil pressure gauage.  Put it on reguar maintenance.  

We've been married 32 years.  And I just retired.

btlbcc
User Rank
Gold
Fuel Pump Problems
btlbcc   7/4/2013 10:02:19 AM
I once had a 1972 Fiat 128, which I bought because it was inexpensive and had front wheel drive (a novelty in those days).  The only serious problem I ever had with the car was the fuel pump, which was electric and mounted to the underside of the body by the fuel tank.  The pump was a small - the word "cute" comes to mind - rotary vane pump with the pump driven by a motor through a magnetic coupling (thus isolating the gasoline from the motor's brushes - this was pre-brushless DC motors).  The pump was really an elegant design, and very well manufactured...except for one problem: the graphite vanes tended to chip and break and jam the pump.  After paying for a couple of new pumps (plus labor), I asked the guys in the service department if they had any old junk fuel pumps they would give me.  I left with a double handful of "dead" fuel pumps.  From that point on, when the pump died, I would get out and under, remove the failed pump (plugging the hose from the fuel tank with a spare socket wrench extension bar) and set up shop on the car's hood to rebuild the pump using spare parts from the "junk" pumps.  I did this a number of times before the car was junked, once at 1 AM under a street light ("Just rebuilding my fuel pump, officer.").  Needless to say, this whole operation was done with gasoline-soaked hands...  More recent cars may have had their problems, but at least the fuel pumps have been reliable.

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Frightening
Mydesign   7/4/2013 5:57:22 AM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
"If some car passing you flicked a cigarette out the window, you could have ended up with a major problem.'

Rob, that's a dangerous situation. Any spark can cause fire, so we have to be careful during the fuel leaking situation.

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Fuel Leaking
Mydesign   7/4/2013 5:54:53 AM
Lynn, I had faced a similar issue with my bike last month. One the way the fuel line got cut and petrol start leaking through the filter directly to the hot engine. I felt the petrol smell and later found that smoke is coming from engine, where the petrol leaked. I go a mechanic and repaired.

patb2009
User Rank
Gold
Why didn't the british ever make micro-electronics
patb2009   7/3/2013 10:54:11 PM
NO RATINGS
They couldn't figure out how to make them leak oil.

Rumour had it the Rutan Vari-EZ had a fuel selector valve below the pilots crotch.

fuel leaks would cause truly awful injuries.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
typical british car
naperlou   7/3/2013 3:17:04 PM
NO RATINGS
Lynn, I feel your pain.  My first vehicles were Austin Healeys, MGs and Triumph motorcycles.  It was crazy.  One car had a fuel pump problem.  The fuel pump was behind the seats under the shelf.  I found that if I hit it with something it would restart.  So, going along I would put in the clutch and hit the fuel pump (really the bolt holding it) and it would start up again and I would just let the clutch go.  This was done at speed.  Quite a thrill.  I had lots of other crazy things happen with those cars.  It was good that they were so cheap and easy to work on.  Lot's of fun to drive, though.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Frightening
Rob Spiegel   7/3/2013 1:19:15 PM
NO RATINGS
Hey Tekochip,

You're lucky you made it home with your ruptured fuel pump. If some car passing you flicked a cigarette out the window, you could have ended up with a major problem.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Frightening
Ann R. Thryft   7/3/2013 12:54:04 PM
NO RATINGS
This has got to be the scariest MbM I've read to date. Regarding tow fees, I'm not so sure about how cheap they'd be. The last time I got towed, about 8 years ago, I paid $100 for 10 miles. That was a shocker. Now I pay AAA less than that per year to give me free tows when traveling up to 100 miles away from my home.

lgrant
User Rank
Bronze
Re: Frightening
lgrant   7/3/2013 12:01:37 PM
NO RATINGS
I had another mechanical-fuel-pump problem in my 1978 Chevette. I drove home one night with no problems, and the next day the car would not start. I finally figured out that the rubber hose that connected the steel line from the gas tank to the input of the fuel pump had about a 1/2-inch long longitudinal split. My theory was that it split while I was driving home, and the suction from the fuel pump kept it closed, but when I turned off the car it opened up, and the pump couldn't get any suction when I tried to start it again. (I guess it is also possible that it just decided to split during the night, but it seemed more likely that it would split while it was getting jostled around by the road bumps.)

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Frightening
tekochip   7/3/2013 11:22:04 AM
Wow, that's frightening.  I can't believe there was enough vapor to keep the engine running with all the air currents under the hood and not ignite from another source.
 
I was coming home from a gig one night and the car could only just stay at highway speed when I held the pedal to the floor.  I pulled over and saw that the mechanical fuel pump (remember those?) was belching fuel from its relief hole.  It was late at night, and I still had to get my date home, so I simply continued driving, pulling over for gas every 20 miles or so.  Of course, gas was about .50/gal back then.  These days it would be cheaper to tow the car.


<<  <  Page 4/4


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Take a look through these film and TV robots from 1990 through 1994.
The Soofa is an urban smart bench that provides mobile device charging as well as collects environmental information via wireless sensors.
Sciaky, provider of electron-beam additive manufacturing (EBAM) services, will start selling these machines commercially in September. The company has used its EBAM 3D printing technology for making very large, high-value, metal prototypes and production parts for aerospace and defense OEMs.
At this year’s Google I/O, the spotlight was pointed on gender inequality in the high-tech industry. Google has established a new initiative that it hopes will even out the playing field, Made w/Code. Part of this initiative will fund free online courses in basic coding.
Self-driving vehicle technology could grow rapidly over the next two decades, with nearly 95 million “autonomous-capable” cars being sold annually around the world by 2035, a new study predicts.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 4 - 8, Introduction to Linux Device Drivers
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: August 12 - 14
Sponsored by igus
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service