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shehan
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Re: Start of a Trend?
shehan   6/26/2013 4:47:14 PM
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@Ann – All technology comes at a high price most of the time, later when there is competition in the market the manufacturers are forced to bring down the prices for the product to survive in the market. 

shehan
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Gold
Re: Pricing of the 450
shehan   6/26/2013 4:45:49 PM
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@Ann – I am wondering if they only give out prices for quotations and proposals to keep their price hidden from the rest of the world. 

shehan
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Gold
Re: Start of a Trend?
shehan   6/26/2013 4:43:27 PM
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@78RPM - Yes model builders will definitely find this very useful; it helps them save their time. Now it's just a matter of designing the 3D model and the printer will do the rest for you, whereas sometime back you need to craft the object. 

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Pricing of the 450
shehan   6/26/2013 4:40:16 PM
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@David – I think we should give it few more days for the product to establish its self in the market and automatically the prices will fluctuate with the competition. I am sure it would not be a monopoly or oligopoly, as there are many manufactures waiting to enter into the market.

shehan
User Rank
Gold
Re: Start of a Trend?
shehan   6/26/2013 4:37:51 PM
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@Ann  - all devices come in small sizes with same or better performance, I think the same concept applies here. 3D printer manufacturers making smaller versions of their machines with smaller build volumes that still can use complex 3D printing technologies

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Start of a Trend?
Ann R. Thryft   6/26/2013 12:42:44 PM
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78RPM makes an interesting point about metals printers and service bureaus. Right now, these machines/processes and their materials are probably way too pricey for that. They were developed to serve high-end applications in industrial, military and aerospace markets, so pricing is on a very different scale from anything aimed at consumers. This is an important point to keep in mind about 3D printing/AM--there are two very different ends of the industry.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Pricing of the 450
Ann R. Thryft   6/26/2013 12:39:02 PM
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David is right, and I agree. I couldn't find price info anywhere either.  I've found this to be a common practice among various vendors that supply defense and aerospace markets.

78RPM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Start of a Trend?
78RPM   6/26/2013 12:09:24 PM
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This smaller printer would be useful for model builders (including model engines) if the price is right. Of course, 3D service bureaus would be an option. I see news today that Stratasys plans to grow by acquiring companies that make 3D metals printers.

far911
User Rank
Silver
Re: Start of a Trend?
far911   6/26/2013 3:53:24 AM
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@Ann - Good point. With advancements and measures like this, 3D printers are sure to make it to mainstream usage in a short period of time. 

David_Cartwright
User Rank
Iron
Pricing of the 450
David_Cartwright   6/26/2013 2:18:39 AM
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It is disappointing that Optomec is so secretive about the cost of this unit. What do they achieve by this as competitors will easily come up with ways to find out?

In the recent numerous articles on the unit I have been unable to find any reference to its price, that will determine whether or not it is applicable for my application.

Does anyone know the price of the unit?

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