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mrdon
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Gold
ISORGs Flexible Sensor Videos
mrdon   6/20/2013 2:05:32 PM
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Ann, Good article and very interesting subject on the ISORG's flexible Image sensors. In watching the videos, which the demos were quite impressive, I noticed both the pdf browser and 3D image manipulation were operated with no human contact. I see a plethora of applications being developed within the HMI space because of the hand gesture control opposed to touch. Just wondering if this sensor technology uses capacitive-proximity detection for engaging with the target product? This new HMI tech could be part of CAD 2.0 article Cabe wrote recently. Very nice article indeed!!

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: ISORGs Flexible Sensor Videos
Charles Murray   6/20/2013 8:41:53 PM
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Cool story, Ann. What kind of applications would be specifically well-suited for the flexibility of this image sensor?

mrdon
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Gold
Re: ISORGs Flexible Sensor Videos
mrdon   6/20/2013 10:21:42 PM
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Charles, I'm curious as well as to what the intended applications ISORG has planned for their flexible image sensor. I do believe that have a great technology for the HMI and Gesture controls space.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: ISORGs Flexible Sensor Videos
Ann R. Thryft   6/21/2013 1:14:13 PM
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Thanks, mrdon. That's a good point about the HMI--and in fact, the demonstrator demonstrates the power of using an image sensor for gesture-based HMI. That's how Kinect works: with an image sensor.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: ISORGs Flexible Sensor Videos
Ann R. Thryft   6/21/2013 1:15:04 PM
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Chuck, apps include anything with a camera. When image sensors started being made in CMOS instead of CCDs, that made it possible to include them in laptops (=webcams) and cell phones. When this prototype's process becomes higher-res and high-volume, they can be printed on flexible substrates, which means anything that's small: phones, wristbands, all kinds of places that we haven't thought of yet. Who ever thought years back that we'd have cameras in portable phones?

mrdon
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Gold
Re: ISORGs Flexible Sensor Videos
mrdon   6/21/2013 8:01:23 PM
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Ann

What's really cool about this technology is there are no boundaries to applications development. In the videos that were presented, several gesture gaming control applications popped in my head. The impressive part about this imaging sensor is the ability to be package into any object because of its flexible - printed circuit attibutes.

Greg M. Jung
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Platinum
Flexibility
Greg M. Jung   6/21/2013 11:21:52 PM
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I especially appreciate the flexible nature of this technology.  'Wearable' smart devices (i.e. wristband) could become more of a reality with the ability to curve or bend the display surface.  I would imagine the flexibility of this display surface would open up many new markets for innovative display applications.

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Flexibility
Charles Murray   6/23/2013 5:48:59 PM
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Greg, are we talking about something like Dick Tracy's two-way wrist TV here? 

Greg M. Jung
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Platinum
Re: Flexibility
Greg M. Jung   6/23/2013 8:59:43 PM
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Yes (you read my mind). I have to admit this thought did pop into my head while I was reading this article. (Maybe this wristwatch isn't so far away after all).

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: ISORGs Flexible Sensor Videos
Ann R. Thryft   6/24/2013 11:58:34 AM
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mrdon, I agree: this technology not only can be applied to existing applications, but it's the kind of enabling technology that can inspire and make possible new applications.

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