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Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Re: 3D in manufacturing
Debera Harward   6/22/2013 6:17:05 PM
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As advancement is going on in 3D Printing technology accuracy has  improved and size of printed objects  has also increased .With this advancement now air plane parts , aerodynamic car bodies  are being 3D printed . But one should remember that it is not only used to recreat the objects but it can also be used to creat new and different objects which never created .

Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Re: 3D in manufacturing
Debera Harward   6/22/2013 6:11:35 PM
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Yes Rob you are correct , it is an excellent idea that 3D printing is not just used for prototyping it  is also now used for manufacturing . Creating 3D prited airbus was an excellent idea and it really fascinated me . Now 3D printing is comming towards consumer friendly price points . 3D printing which was initially used for prototyping is now being used in number of industries like aerospace . defense , automative and healthcare etc.

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
High Mix/Low Volume
Greg M. Jung   6/21/2013 11:33:05 PM
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I can see a future niche for using 3D printers for high mix/low volume manufacturing.  For certain products, it would be cost-effective for the 'limited edition' version of a product to be printed on a 3D printer. 

I also see a niche for 'personalized' products built with 3D printers.  A company might take your personal measurements and preferences and built a unique, one-of-a-kind product using this technology.

garyhlucas
User Rank
Gold
Re: 3D in manufacturing
garyhlucas   6/20/2013 9:22:41 PM
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I was at the midatlantic design conference today.  I saw the Baxter robot there.  It occured to me that a 3D printer is the perfect accessory for that robot. It was designed to be very flexible and easy to teach a process.  However you still need a gripper and possibly fixtures for holding parts for assembly, packaging etc.  So they could provide 3D cad files of the end of arm interface or stock gripping mechanism. Then you'd add the necessary shapes required to handle your part to the model, print it, and this afternoon you could be doing a whole new task. What  a great combination!

Gary H. Lucas

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: 3D in manufacturing
Charles Murray   6/20/2013 8:58:05 PM
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I know what you mean, tool_maker, the Airbus plan sounds a little out there. For your viewing enjoyment, here's a little video about other things Airbus plans to do by 2050.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSEl8bF6xOk

Tool_maker
User Rank
Platinum
Re: 3D in manufacturing
Tool_maker   6/20/2013 4:53:40 PM
NO RATINGS
  What you are doing sounds incredibly cool and useful, but the thought of 3D printing an airbus gives me the willies. I know machines can be remarkable and people can make mistakes, but I still would feel better knowing the plane was assembled by craftsmen rather than printed by a machine.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: 3D in manufacturing
Ann R. Thryft   6/20/2013 12:24:08 PM
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Lou, thanks for that input. I think that's a good point about multiple manufacturing technologies available to the design engineer, and how important the CAD interfaces are.

Ramjet
User Rank
Silver
Re: 3D in manufacturing
Ramjet   6/20/2013 11:48:19 AM
NO RATINGS
I am campaigning now for a 3D printer for prototyping at my work. I love the fact I can send models to it easily from my Solidworks 3D Cad software. (save as then copy to printer)

The PLA material is a lower cost, (lower melt point?) material, I have samples made from it, they are very good.

While the strength will be low compared to metal production builds the resolution is comparable to machine work.

Thus we can ensure fit and ease of assembly at a much lower cost.

Personally I would love one for my hobbies but the price is still a bit out of reach for that.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Re: 3D in manufacturing
naperlou   6/20/2013 11:19:18 AM
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Ann, you are correct.  I was talking to a small shop just the other day.  They have used 3D printing for some types of low rate custom products.  They also use a corn stalk based plastic in their 3D printer.  I think it was PLA.  They gave me a small Tardis model made with PLA.  It is very detailed.

On the other hand, there is a point at which injection molding becomes more effective.  Even if you use aluminum for the mold, if you have a CNC machine it is generally easy to do. 

What is interesting is that there are so many good new manufacturing technologies available.  The distinguishing feature of many of them is the ability to interface directly with CAD systems.  Using the right manufacturing technology for the particular part will help streamline manufacturing and make it more efficient.  3D can be a big part of that.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: 3D in manufacturing
Ann R. Thryft   6/19/2013 1:18:58 PM
NO RATINGS
Rob, low-volume manufacturing is not a new idea in 3D printing, especially for aerospace, as we've covered before:
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=262205
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=258652
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=251526



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