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J. Williams
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Platinum
Re: Enhancing energy efficiency
J. Williams   6/17/2013 5:22:55 PM
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A small shock.  I like the pun.  :-)

My temptation would be to use piezo crystals embedded within the shoe.  However, I'm not really sure how much useful power would get from this method. 

A more practical approach to generating power through the use of a "knee brace"

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57556543-1/tired-of-clunky-batteries-slap-on-these-power-leg-braces/ 

If you hike during daylight hours, a small PV panel is probably the most cost effective.

Pubudu
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Platinum
Re: Enhancing energy efficiency
Pubudu   6/17/2013 1:32:25 PM
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Elizabeth, Can this technology be downsizing I mean generate electricity with a small shock,

I am thinking of charging my phone or I pad while on walk. 

Pubudu
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Platinum
Re: A Lot o' Watt
Pubudu   6/17/2013 1:26:14 PM
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Tekochip, what will be the best option for storing this energy. I believe that storing in the main vehicle battery  is a again vesting of generated electricity. 

Pubudu
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Platinum
Re: Innovative Thinking
Pubudu   6/17/2013 1:08:16 PM
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Exactly it is un-seen source of generating power it's a truly a innovation, I believe that the identify the source is more difficult think than to develop the technology. 

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Enhancing energy efficiency
Ann R. Thryft   6/17/2013 12:08:25 PM
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Lou, what an interesting point. Thanks for the info about MIT and patents. I wonder what other schools do this?

J. Williams
User Rank
Platinum
Re: A Lot o' Watt but not many Joules
J. Williams   6/17/2013 11:29:18 AM
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Lotta watts on a low-duty cycle does not add up to a lotta energy.  We have a 1kW sonar projector that uses about 8 watts on average.  If you think you are losing that much energy to your shocks, they would be as hot as pistols after driving down the road.  Check them.  They might be a little warm, unless you happen to be Baja or motocross racing.

Interesting idea, always good to pursue the edge of technology but this is not ready for prime time because it is very unlikely to produce a positive return on investment.  Give me a figure of merit like joules per installed dollar or something so we can evaluate the effectiveness of the system.

ttemple
User Rank
Platinum
Re: put it in perspective
ttemple   6/17/2013 11:26:23 AM
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William K.

I question it too, especially on smooth roads.  I don't doubt that they may observe 1kw power peaks, but without knowing the duration and frequency of the peaks, that value is rather meaningless.  I don't think that the shocks would put out anywhere near 1KW continuously.

In the end, it all matters, though.  I'm not saying this is a bad idea, just trying to put it in perspective.  You are not going to double the mileage of a vehicle by collecting energy from shock absorbers.  If the system reduced alternator loading by some significant percentage, that is still a savings in the end.  As long as it doesn't cost an inordinate amount for the savings it could be worth while.  If it also improves the ride, etc., those are other reasons to justify the cost.

I checked out the video on their website, and I wouldn't want to drive on the road they are simulating in that test!  That would be a kidney buster!

 

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Storing the energy
Rob Spiegel   6/17/2013 11:05:11 AM
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That's right, Chuck. I'm still betting on the internal combusion engine to get us to the cafe standard.

GeorgeG
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Platinum
Re: Storing the energy
GeorgeG   6/17/2013 8:58:09 AM
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Try http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/atv.shtml

According to this idle losses are 3% but that seems to be enough to justify stop and go technology. Braking losses at 4-5% equally justify regenerative braking.

Using current technology, solar on the roof can be good for ~6% fuel economy given typical driving in the sunshine states.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: put it in perspective
William K.   6/17/2013 8:52:31 AM
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I sort of question the claim as to the amount of power available from recovering skock absorber energy for one simple reason, which is that in current units all of that bump energy is converted to heat, and the shocks don't get that hot. Of course, there are parts of some roadways where they would easily deliver that much power, but for the most part there would not be that much.

Now 9HP is not much compared to the truck engines maximum delivered power, but it does compare quite closely with the alternator load, so that portion of the assertion is certainly valid. But the cost of such a system could easily be the show-stopper, since it would be a lot more than the present kind of shock absorbers. The description of the additional hardware was not very detailed, but it must be fairly complex.

One more thing is that the present engine driven alternator can charge the battery when the vehicle is not moving, and when it is moving quite slowly. Providing power during very slow driving is vital, especially for vehicles that must traverse Interstate 94 passing Gary, Indiana. Probably there are other roads that have as big a problem, but I am not aware of them.

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