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GeorgeG
User Rank
Platinum
Re: put it in perspective
GeorgeG   6/17/2013 8:48:55 AM
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Putting it in perspective, thats 9 kW on a 'normal' road while the 600 Hp engine is rarely taxed to 100% and doing much less when cruising. These days with fuel costs punishing truckers its never an either/or decision. Note the second value is improved ride thanks to a more complex hydraulic circuit.

ttemple
User Rank
Platinum
put it in perspective
ttemple   6/17/2013 7:07:12 AM
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Looking past the confusion over power and energy, 1KW of Power is approximately 1-1/3 HP.  So, if a large truck shocks would somehow continually generate 1KW of power, that would equate to about 9HP (based on 6 shocks).

A typical truck would have an engine that produces in the vicinity of 600HP.  So, even if the shocks put out 9HP continuously (which they would not, unless the road was continuously bumpy), it would amount to about 1.5% of the power of the engine.

According to one source, new style tires can improve the efficiency of a truck by 7%.  Keep your shocks, I'll take the tires.

 

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: A Lot o' Watt
mrdon   6/16/2013 4:42:51 PM
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Debera Harward,

I agree. This article is very informative and the technology topic is quite relevant. Using the vehicle's mechanics to create energy seems a no brainer. I can see Car Alternator manufacturers becoming disgruntle because of the potential to replace their product with this new energy harvesting based shock absorber. Very interesting article indeed.

a.saji
User Rank
Silver
Re: A Lot o' Watt
a.saji   6/16/2013 9:13:36 AM
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@telkochip: Yes true indeed but we do not have any other option other than this isn't it ?             

Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Re: A Lot o' Watt
Debera Harward   6/16/2013 9:05:47 AM
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Thanks Elizebeth for such an informative post , what i beleive is that the bumps experienced by the cars produces voltage and when that voltage is stored in the passenger car produces 100 to 400 Watts however in heavy truckss results in 1KW of energy and that energy is then used to chaarge the batteries of the car .

ttemple
User Rank
Platinum
KW is not a unit for energy
ttemple   6/15/2013 8:46:56 PM
Just to clarify something very basic.  1KW is not energy, it is power.  If something produces a 1KW pulse of very short duration, it could be an accurate statement to say that the device produced 1KW of "power", but the amount of energy is the product of power and time.  For short duration pulses of 1KW, the amount of energy may be miniscule.

So, perhaps these devices produce impulses of 1KW.  What is the duration and frequency of them?  Is the amount of energy produced meaningful?

If the energy is going to be expressed in terms of watts, a time unit must be involved, such as KWH.  Killowatt Hours is a unit of energy.  If they state the energy in terms of killowatt hours, it would be more meaningful.  It is not meaningful to produce power pulses of 1KW if they are not sustained.  On a smooth road, the shocks would not produce sustained power, because they would not be moving on a smooth road.

The terms power and energy should not be used interchangeably.  They are not the same thing.  Saying that a shock is 1KW is a very deceptive.  I want to know how many KWH the thing produces per unit of time, not how much peak power it can produce.

 

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
A Lot o' Watt
tekochip   6/14/2013 9:07:08 PM
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1KW per shock is a huge amount of energy, I can't believe we've just been throwing all of that away.


Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Storing the energy
Charles Murray   6/14/2013 4:29:10 PM
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Yes, if there's one big thing that the 54.5-mpg mandate has done, it's been to push the state of the art in internal combustion engines. It's amazing how many press releases I've seen about more efficient engines in the past 12 months,

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Storing the energy
Rob Spiegel   6/14/2013 4:18:08 PM
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I can see that, Chuck. I think that's part of the play they have in the quest for a highly efficient internal combustion engine.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Storing the energy
Charles Murray   6/14/2013 4:14:45 PM
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Again, I can't say for sure, but I've been hearing that figure for years. I believe it is based on a huge percentage (maybe 60-65%) of the engine's energy being lost as waste heat and friction. The biggest innovation would be to figure out how that waste heat could be harvested.

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