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Rob Spiegel
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Re: Storing the energy
Rob Spiegel   6/14/2013 4:05:56 PM
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Only 15 percent for moving the car forward. That's a shocker, Chuck. Does it really take 85 percent to run the air conditioner and the sound system?

Charles Murray
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Re: Storing the energy
Charles Murray   6/14/2013 4:01:51 PM
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I don't know for sure, Rob, but I would suppose it's just an extra energy source, reducing the parasitic nature of your electrical features. It's said today that only 15% of the volume of your gasoline tank is used to propel a car forward, so if you have an additional electrical source, it can improve your fuel efficiency. Originally, I believe the idea of items like this one was to use the extra energy to run accessories, such as refrigeration units, on big trucks, particulaly in the military. Judging from what Liz is saying here, it appears to be making the transition to passenger cars now. Seems like it could be used to recharge the batteries in a hybrid or EV, too, but I don't know if that's happening.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Storing the energy
Rob Spiegel   6/14/2013 3:29:38 PM
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Thanks Chuck. What is the advantage of using the shock energy versus the energy coming from the alternator?

Charles Murray
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Re: Storing the energy
Charles Murray   6/14/2013 2:01:58 PM
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Ultimately, Rob, I believe the idea is to store the current in the vehicle's battery. But the trick is to make sure the electrical current is usable by the battery, and so they have to filter it first to take out the voltage spikes that the shock aborbers produce. To do that, they probably use voltage regulators.

taimoortariq
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Gold
great innovation
taimoortariq   6/14/2013 11:47:40 AM
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Great article Elizabeth. They have truly utilized the random bumping of the car quite effectively. And getting 1KW of energy from only 6 bumps seems like a very successful result.

PS like Rob, I am also wondering how are they storing the energy that is being produced.

 

Greg M. Jung
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Platinum
Innovative Thinking
Greg M. Jung   6/14/2013 10:50:54 AM
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Great idea for taking a non-obvious energy generation opportunity and turning it into a reality.  Nice example of innovative thinking and clever application development that could be a break-through technology in the future.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Storing the energy
Rob Spiegel   6/14/2013 10:01:29 AM
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Nice article Elizabeth. How would the energy that is gathered be stored? what would the benefit of giving the alternator be? 

naperlou
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Enhancing energy efficiency
naperlou   6/14/2013 9:49:50 AM
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Elizabeth, this is a great example of how engineers respond to problems to find solutions.  That is happened at MIT is not a suprise.  MIT has always had a policy that encourages the creation of patents from research at the school.  They have a generous program of sharing the revenue with the professors and students.  This enriches both the institution and the population.  Most other schools do not do this.  I have sat through presentations on some very innovative technologies at other schools and find that there is no attempt to patent the technology. 

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