HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 4/5  >  >>
Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Printed chocolate has gotta be coming
Rob Spiegel   6/11/2013 9:49:20 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, William K, TJ McDermott posted this video of 3D chocolate in an early comment. You're right, it's a stream.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: 3D Printing With Sugar
William K.   6/13/2013 9:26:08 PM
NO RATINGS
Debera, the point of most confections is that besides being art they are also food. So durability and longevity are not major requirements. I prefer my confections to not contain a lot of preservatives, even though I am certain that the preservatives I have eaten are preserving me. 

Besides all of that, would you really want a desert that was "durable?" I would never choose a pie with a durable crust, I think that most would agree with that.

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
SUGAR
bobjengr   6/22/2013 8:14:10 PM
NO RATINGS
I beg to differ with you on this one Nadine.  My wife owned and ran a catering company for 17 years to help with our three son's tuition.  One of the hardest things to bring about was innovation to baked goods, specifically wedding cakes.  You have to be extremely creative to meet the ever-changing needs of brides (and their mom's) when designing these cakes.  Same-o-same-o just won't do.  I definitely wish 3D printing had been available during those years.  Maybe we could have really made the news.  Excellent article Cabe.

vimalkumarp
User Rank
Gold
3D printing with sugar
vimalkumarp   6/24/2013 6:16:27 AM
NO RATINGS
This is really a wonderful example of applying the learning from one domain to another. This is also open new avenues in the catering/ confectionery segment.

dnear1
User Rank
Iron
Re: not new and not interesting
dnear1   8/21/2013 9:30:16 AM
NO RATINGS
I also disagree with Nadine. Innovation is taking technology and finding innovative ways that it has not been used before. Far from wasteful, this could open up another unique, useful innovation that even you might find very useful. sugar could be used as a dissolvable raft that helps Build more complex geometries with other extruded solids that wasn't previously possible. Bravo for these and other people who think far outside the box and capitalizing on it. Don't stifle innovation, support it!

Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Re: 3D Printing With Sugar
Debera Harward   8/21/2013 12:11:12 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks William for making this clear . 3D printing with sugar can be the future technology for bakeries as well it can be used in the places or by the people who dont have ovens . Initially 3D printing was used to develop physical objects but now they are being used to creat cake ,biscuits , pasteries and other bakery  items and there toppings.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: not new and not interesting
NadineJ   8/21/2013 1:13:28 PM
NO RATINGS
The tone has definitely shifted a bit.  Thanks for calling me out specifically to disagree although many others have expressed the same opinion.

One definition of innovation is taking existing technology and using it in new ways.  Many so called inventors and companies have made their fortunes doing that.  Historically, Elias Singer and Apple.

This is cute and fun but not innovation in any form.  3D printing is still in its infancy.  Most of what's touted as innovation is just new material with limited end use (sugar) or just for shock (guns).

The limitations are why I say it's not innovation and it's wasteful.  Cute and fun.  Not new and not interesting.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Edible Desserts, etc.
NadineJ   8/21/2013 1:16:35 PM
NO RATINGS
OLD_CURMUDGEON--You wrote: Another blogger commented about "IMHO" (whatever that means???)

Bold lettering aside, IMHO is a common acronym that means In My Humble Opinion.  Similar to LOL which means Laugh Out Loud.

I'll try to avoid using acronyms in the future.

OLD_CURMUDGEON
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Edible Desserts, etc.
OLD_CURMUDGEON   8/21/2013 1:49:51 PM
Guess I'm too darn old, and NOT hip to the modern jargon.  Plus, my typewriter doesn't have any of those aforementioned keys specifically identified.  And, I didn't see any on my slide rule either.  When I get home, I'll look at the wif'e abacus to see if it has any of these terms, but I'm fairly certain it doesn't either.

ADIOS!

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: not new and not interesting
William K.   8/22/2013 5:36:14 PM
NO RATINGS
Taking a 3D printer and adapting the concept to a fundamentally different materil, (sugar) is certainly innovation, as is printing out one-off medical implants made withtitanium powder. Both are innovation. Building electronic assemblies as parts of a 3D printed item will also be quite an innovation. And it is probably just a matter of time before somebody figures out how to use 3D printing with explosives, so as to do things like explosive welding, which were invented many years back but very seldom proved useful. 

But printing with sugar has got to be a real acievement because of the properties of the material: it absorbs moisture and it has chemical changes at lower temperatures. Metals and plastics are much simpler to work with. So while the range of product applications may be smaller, it is certainly an interesting innovation.

<<  <  Page 4/5  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Samsung's Galaxy line of smartphones used to fare quite well in the repairability department, but last year's flagship S5 model took a tumble, scoring a meh-inducing 5/10. Will the newly redesigned S6 lead us back into star-studded territory, or will we sink further into the depths of a repairability black hole?
Fifteen European research centers have launched EuroCPS to help European companies develop innovative products for the Internet of Things.
Get your Allman Brothers albums ready. The iconic Volkswagen Microbus may be poised for a comeback, and this time it could be electric.
In 2003, the world contained just over 500 million Internet-connected devices. By 2010, this figure had risen to 12.5 billion connected objects, almost six devices per individual with access to the Internet. Now, as we move into 2015, the number of connected 'things' is expected to reach 25 billion, ultimately edging toward 50 billion by the end of the decade.
NASA engineer Brian Trease studied abroad in Japan as a high school student and used to fold fast-food wrappers into cranes using origami techniques he learned in library books. Inspired by this, he began to imagine that origami could be applied to building spacecraft components, particularly solar panels that could one day send solar power from space to be used on earth.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
3/31/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
5/7/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 20 - 24, Taking the Internet of Things to the Cloud
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Proto Labs
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service