View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 3/5  >  >>
Debera Harward
User Rank
3D Printing With Sugar
Debera Harward   6/9/2013 2:00:56 AM
Cabe, Thats really an interesting article and i am too much surprised and excited to hear that 3D printing can be done with sugar .This is indeed a very sweet concept .But is 3D printing with sugar safe ?what i beleive is that sugar melts at particular temperature doesnt that object also gets melted . Secondly do we have to protect the sugar 3D printed object with insects . Is this printing long lasting ?

William K.
User Rank
3D printing with sugar, again
William K.   6/8/2013 9:47:06 AM
Prining with sugar would also be a good way to make positives for casting many materials. The finished sugar object could simply be disolved from inside the coating, not quite like the lost wax or styrofoam processes, but using water instead of heat. Much less enviromental impact, I think, and all done at low temperature. And the material is cheaper. 

Of course, making edible decorations is a nice niche to be in because hereis not much competition, at least not yet.And for those who complain about the sugar being unhealthy, this is probably expensive enough to prevent a whole lot of consumption.

And about the melting temperature; softening and reduction of bond strength happen at much lower temperatures than the melting point, as with many other materials.

User Rank
Re: Edible Desserts, etc.
OLD_CURMUDGEON   6/7/2013 7:42:38 AM
Charles,  The vans that I've referred to showcase edible fruit, vegetables which have been artistically decorated into an arrangement, and are then consumed at various galas, functions, meetings, receptions, etc.  These are for EATING, not for decoration, but they've been "stylized" to add to the decorum of the events.

Another blogger commented about "IMHO" (whatever that means???) ,and called it wasteful...... IF people consume the end product, then WHY is it wasteful????

User Rank
3D Printing with Sugar
apresher   6/6/2013 8:36:37 PM
Definitely some commercial opportunities combining interesting designs and sugar.  Would think there are many ways this could be used.  Good story.

User Rank
Re: hive76
mr_bandit   6/6/2013 7:50:42 PM
I forgot to mention that  the hive76 process is *fully open-source*, unlike what this couple is doing. Following the link: (quote)

Here's a step-by-step of Jordan's many year process:
  1. Get a crazy idea to link sugar and vasculature when comparing the interior of a 3D print to a capillary network.
  2. Get a PhD in bioengineering
  3. Move to Philadelphia
  4. Join a hackerspace
  5. Get introduced to 3D printing, MakerBot and RepRap
  6. Assemble your first MakerBot
  7. Invent a heated build platform to dry your sugar while printing.
  8. Add a heater to the Frostruder so you can print molten sugar.
  9. Assemble a customized RepRap Mendel that fits your new extruder.
  10. Get help from your hackerspace to properly control your pneumatic extrusion.
  11. Work for months perfecting recipes and methods for printing vasculature.
  12. Write it all up in a research paper and submit!

You can read the Penn press release about this awesome science, an overview from Science News, or the full paper. A more detailed post about the hardware used in this project will follow and soon you'll be able to make your own sugar extruder. (It prints chocolate too!)

Charles Murray
User Rank
Re: Edible Desserts, etc.
Charles Murray   6/6/2013 7:48:23 PM
You're right, OldCurmudgeon. Bakeries have offered edible flowers on cakes for decades.

User Rank
mr_bandit   6/6/2013 7:28:33 PM
The Philly hackerspace hive76 did this a year ago:



A biochemist was looking for a way to print blood vessels to make kidneys. He went to hive76 to see if they can print in sugar - they figured it out.

So - old news - a hackerspace beat them to it.

- quote -

One of our core members, Jordan Miller, has just published a scientific paper using RepRap 3D printing technology to engineer living tissues for regenerative medicine. I'll give you a rundown of the science and a step-by-step guide of how Jordan got to this great spot in his career. Jordan is quick to point out that this is work that would not have been possible 5 years ago, or without the help of RepRap, Hive76, and this wonderful city of Philadelphia.




User Rank
Thanks a lot Cabe
Watashi   6/6/2013 1:42:51 PM
Are you trying to kill 3D printing!!!  First you write about printing guns and now sugar!  A certain mayor of NYC is going to ban 3D printers as weapons of mass destruction!

But seriously, my hardy best wishes to the couple.  I hope they profit handsomely from their ingenuity.  It is a very inspiring story. 

...And it may be just the hook I need to get my wife on board with me buying a 3D printer.

User Rank
Sugar melt temperature
namarena   6/6/2013 12:52:45 PM
Very interesting, but sucrose (plain sugar) melts at 366.8 deg F not 150 F. Just to keep things straight.

User Rank
Re: How does it work?
Zippy   6/6/2013 10:24:29 AM
I smiled a little at the repeated warnings that sugar melts in water and under heat.  Is the assumption that engineers don't know the properties of common cooking ingredients?  Note:  Unless you work for the design firm of Hansel & Gretel and build gingerbread houses for wicked witches, DO NOT use sugar in load-bearing structures!  :)

<<  <  Page 3/5  >  >>

Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
A panel on cybersecurity at ARM TechCon called for regulations to protect the security of connected devices.
Do you wear your ugly Christmas sweater while fighting zombies, or simply chill in front of your homemade entertainment center while your automated cat feeder keeps your feline friend at bay? Whatever you prefer, one of the following gadgets is sure to get your DIY motor running.
The design of products has been altered altogether through 3D printing. Parts that couldn’t be produced at all before 3D printing came along are often superior to conventionally produced parts.
Marine mussels and their interaction with the ocean environment has inspired a breakthrough in developing a nontoxic coating for organic electronic components that also could speed up the manufacturing process.
The Innovation Challenge Awards had one run-away winner at ARM TechCon 2016. Of the six awards presented, one company walked away with four.
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 10 - 14, Embedded System Design Techniques™: Getting Started Developing Professional Embedded Software
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7 | 8 | 9 | 10

Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Course November 8 - 10:
Sponsored by 3M
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2016 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service