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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: RoboBee
Ann R. Thryft   6/20/2013 12:14:52 PM
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far911, thanks, those are good additions to the list. See other flying robots that do those things and more in this recent slideshow: http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=264353

far911
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Silver
Re: RoboBee
far911   6/20/2013 7:03:25 AM
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@Ann - Not only sureillance or search-and-rescue but also discovery of natural resource pools, capturing rare footage, and exploration done by chanels like National Geographic. 

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: RoboBee
Ann R. Thryft   6/6/2013 1:02:57 PM
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sonofsoil17, that's an interesting idea about using energy harvesting for RoboBee instead of onboard power storage. I'm pretty sure electrical engineers are already on this research team and they may be working on that idea already.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: RoboBee
Ann R. Thryft   6/5/2013 1:19:04 PM
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far911 nailed one of the apps not really mentioned by the researchers, but implied by some statements on the RoboBee project page: surveillance, as well as search-and-rescue.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: RoboBee
Ann R. Thryft   6/5/2013 1:17:12 PM
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Chuck, the flapping wing thing is insanely hard to do. I'm putting together another flying robot slideshow, and reading more about the R&D involved. It just doesn't happen quickly, no matter who's worked on it.

sonofsoil17
User Rank
Iron
Re: RoboBee
sonofsoil17   6/5/2013 12:41:15 PM
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Cool mechanical feat!  The tether is just a challange I think this group has yet to be addressed.  You don't necessarily need an onboard rechargeable battery.  If some electrical engineers get involved, you'll see things like harvesting radio signals and temperature changes to power capacitors or batteries and using the mechanical structure (maybe with modifications) for the communications and antenna, etc.  Now if we can just get this mechanical swarm flying and design it to zap mosquitos near my backyard deck! 

Elizabeth M
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Blogger
Re: RoboBee
Elizabeth M   6/5/2013 4:19:22 AM
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I agree with Al that 10 years is a long time in the making but they are impressive-looking robots! The tethering at this point is a bit cumbersome, I suppose, but as you point out, Ann, it's quite complex to design these type of robots, so it's still quite an accomplishment. And they just look really cool.

far911
User Rank
Silver
Re: RoboBee
far911   6/5/2013 3:06:22 AM
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For some reason, this reminds me of the Kracker Jackers in The Hunger Games. Those damn things were venomous. Coming back to the topic, this is certainly an impressive feat. And now that I think of it, these little guys will help immensely in exploration by getting through hard-to-reach places.

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: RoboBee
Charles Murray   6/4/2013 6:59:05 PM
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Cool story, Ann. I'm amazed by the flapping wing concept. The dynamics of this appear to be much different than the graceful flapping of Festo's SmartBird. Has anyone else used this concept in larger sizes?

warren@fourward.com
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Robobee flight
warren@fourward.com   6/4/2013 6:45:01 PM
They may have just solved the problem with the bees disappearing (or returning to their home world).  We just need enough operators to go into the fields and pollinate all the flowers with these little flappy things.  The honey might taste a little oily.  Think of the employment possibilities, at less than 30 hours a week, of course- thank you Mr. President.

All that aside, I can only imagine what it took to get this far.  If they could just lose the tether.

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