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Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: Yield from panels
Mydesign   6/3/2014 7:41:24 AM
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"MIT is now looking at incorporating graphene into the mix, which would dramatically improve electron loss, making them more efficient. They would also be able to grab power from more of the sun's spectrum besides infrared."

Cabe, that means efficiency can be increased. that's a great news.

Cabe Atwell
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Blogger
Re: Yield from panels
Cabe Atwell   5/31/2014 12:27:22 AM
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MIT is now looking at incorporating graphene into the mix, which would dramatically improve electron loss, making them more efficient. They would also be able to grab power from more of the sun's spectrum besides infrared.

Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: Yield from panels
Mydesign   5/31/2013 4:00:23 AM
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"this bodes well for the future production of more efficient and powerful solar panels. There is a lot of other research in this area that also could provide similar results."

Elizabeth, what are the other types of researches happening in solar energy harvesting?

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Breaking the theoretical barrier
William K.   5/30/2013 4:34:16 PM
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OK, Elizabeth. The big concern of mine is all of those people who have no clue as to all that must happen to make some scientific discovery into a worthwhile product. They tend to blame engineers for not being able to produce instant miracles on demand. If I were that good, I would certainly be very rich indeed. But I am not.

Elizabeth M
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Blogger
Re: Breaking the theoretical barrier
Elizabeth M   5/30/2013 4:40:10 AM
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Thanks for clarifying that, William. I completely see what you're saying and it's true, a lot of the research happening will be in the lab for a long time before it ever makes it out there commercially, if it ever does at all! So your point is completely valid and I hope you don't think I was discounting it. I usually try to clarify this in stories I write so if I wasn't clear in this one, my apologies!

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Breaking the theoretical barrier
William K.   5/29/2013 10:12:38 AM
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Elizabeth, my point was intended to be that a lot of press release type announcements tend to deliver the impression that whatever has been discovered will be available on store shelves in a few weeks, and that this may lead to a whole lot of unreasonable conclusions by many of those who are able to speak very well but posess less technical insight than the averag stone wall or gate post. (pardon the antique analogy.) The overall effect on the technically illiterate general populace is a bit negative, in that as a matter of course, the great expectations are underfulfilled. That in turn leaves room for all kinds of false product representations.

Jim_E
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Thin Film?
Jim_E   5/29/2013 8:33:47 AM
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Instead of being manufactured on rigid silicon wafers like a traditional solar cell, thin film solar cells can be manufactured on a flexible substrate with a reel to reel process similar to offset printing.  Thin film solar cells can even be constructed into products such as roofing materials, and are much cheaper to manufacture than traditional solar cells.  But, their effeciency is much less compared to traditional solar cells, as is their lifespan. 

There are advances being made, but the whole solar marketplace is in a funk due to Chinese production dumping, and the ending of various government subsidies.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Breaking the theoretical barrier
Elizabeth M   5/29/2013 6:03:54 AM
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These are valuable points, William K. As with most research, the path from the lab to commercialization can be longer than expected and filled with trial and error. Perhaps the authors felt pressure to publish, as you suggest, before they had this technology fully baked. But even if it's not the end all be all and only serves to help improve other efforts to boost efficiency of solar cells, it certainly is a good thing.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Thin Film?
Elizabeth M   5/29/2013 6:00:42 AM
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I don't know much about that technology, Jim_E. Can you elaborate?

Jim_E
User Rank
Platinum
Thin Film?
Jim_E   5/28/2013 10:58:59 AM
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I wonder if this technology can also be applied to the much cheaper (but less effecient) thin-film solar cells?

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