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Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Internet of Things in Medical
Charles Murray   5/22/2013 7:45:52 PM
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 I agree, Al. I would like to know more about datometer's projects. Sounds like good material for Design News.  

apresher
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Blogger
Internet of Things in Medical
apresher   5/22/2013 6:38:16 PM
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Datometer.  We would be interested in learning a bit more about the projects you're investigating.  Part of moving efforts forward is awareness of trends and directions that others are planning.  Thanks.

apresher
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Internet of Things in Medical
apresher   5/22/2013 6:32:35 PM
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Paul,  Thanks for the link. It's clear that a lot of this effort centers on collaboration enabled by technology solutions.  The groups you cite are vital to making this provide the results we all know are possible. Thanks.

streetrodder
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Gold
Another effort in that direction
streetrodder   5/22/2013 10:54:26 AM
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This article provides a good example of what can be done.

To move this idea forward, the American College of Clinical Engineering, the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation and the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society sponsor the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) project.  http://www.iheusa.org/index.aspx

IHE brings together providers, manufacturers and professional organizations to create a unified message handling mechanism that allows all involved systems to pass information.  Please consider participating if you're interested.

 

Regards,

Paul Sherman, CCE

 

datometer
User Rank
Iron
The final foot
datometer   5/22/2013 9:56:43 AM
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I've developed biometric testing and monitoring systems and separately on patient biometric reporting systems integrated with hospitals and physicians. I think automated reporting by systems that read biometric data automatically is indeed an emerging frontier we are just beginning to participate in. Instant connections will save lots of lives and help physicians and patients better manage a wide range of maladies. 

Charles Murray
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Re: The Perfect Solution
Charles Murray   5/21/2013 6:47:46 PM
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This is a great step forward. As you point out, though, security will inevitably be an issue, tekochip. Privacy will also be an issue, as more patients object to every aspect of their lives being monitored by the Internet of Things. Ultimately, though, the potential is tremendous, even when balanced against these issues. Great article.

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
The Perfect Solution
tekochip   5/21/2013 9:23:31 AM
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Actually, I've always felt that medical applications are the perfect home for the Internet of Things. I've worked on a few applications that utilize patient monitoring and they allow a patient to leave the hospital because the sensor sends all of its data back to the hospital. As always, you have to worry about security. Somebody will always try to hack it, if for no other purpose than cyber vandalism, sort of the 21st centaury version of a kid throwing a brick through your window.


naperlou
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Next comes lower costs
naperlou   5/21/2013 9:23:13 AM
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Al, this development by GE is an encouraging development.  Healthcare is possibly the most inefficient industry I have ever seen.  This is changing rapidly as technology is applied.  I have predicted for a long while that the application of technology in Healthcare will lower costs.  I thnk we have been seeing this in the slowing of growth in spending.  By making hospitals more efficient we attack the largest cost in the system.  By automating the tracking of things like hygene, as you mention, we can eliminate the cost of infection in the hospital.  This is often cited as a major cost driver.  In addition, just by collecting a lot more data we can begin to see patterns that were not clear before. 

The other day I took my son to a new doctor.  He was moving from the pediatric practice he was in to a regular GP.  What was really funny was that the nurses and doctors were carrying around labtops.  This allowed them to access records.  Another nice thing is that the pediatric practice was automated a couple of years ago and his records were automatically sent over.  WOW! Finally getting into the 20th century.  Now hook this up with what happens in the hospitals and, with very little effort, all of his doctors have access to the full picture.  Imagine that.



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