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Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Probably not
Elizabeth M   5/15/2013 6:42:21 AM
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I agree, Jennifer, this seems a little over the top. I don't have children, and I'm sure it can be helpful in some cases, but isn't knowing that your child's cry means he or she needs a diaper change part of learning to communicate with your baby? I think that kind of communication is natural and far more personal than finding out from an app. In my opinion, they should leave well enough alone when it comes to something like this. Technology already has impersonalized a lot of things we used to use normal human communication for.

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Probably not
tekochip   5/15/2013 10:21:24 AM
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No kidding, so much for parent/child bonding.

Yes Elizibeth, parents quickly learn (in my recollection it was through negative reinforcement) what their child is trying to communicate. Sleepy baby, hungry baby, bored baby, lonely baby, cranky baby; there's a song for each mood. This is what teaches children how to manipulate, I mean, communicate with their parents.

kid-jensen
User Rank
Silver
Re: Probably not
kid-jensen   5/16/2013 9:09:09 AM
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This is the height of irrisponsibility!

Babies already hae an alarm system when nappies need changing, it's called crying..

Inconveniently, the parent needs to be within earshot for this system to work effectively.

Just what disinterested parents need; another excuse to leave troublesome infants to their own devices and go down the Pub, safe in the knowledge that they will get an alert wnen required.

Think of all those extra drinks they can buy when not wasting money on babysitters!

Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Re: Probably not
Debera Harward   5/16/2013 9:38:00 AM
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Jennifer i cant really say whether it is useful or not because in some senarios it can be usefull but not in daily routine . There should be a bonding between children and their parents and using such diapers will not help to creat a strong and healthy relationship between them it will be too robotic. What i am feeling is no doubt technology is a very good thing and it is helping us as well but on the contrary with these developments it is eliminating human bonding and feelings .

You can use such diapers in extreme emergencies or in nursingl Day care schools however making it routine will not be good for your child .

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Probably not
Elizabeth M   5/16/2013 2:56:45 PM
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kid-jensen, this is my sentiment about this invention as well!

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Probably not
Cadman-LT   5/16/2013 9:47:33 PM
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Elizabeth M and kid-jensen, I agree. Don't have kids if you aren't willing to do the work.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Probably not
Cabe Atwell   5/17/2013 4:41:43 PM
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I would like to keep my personal life private. Not let my twitter thread broadcast what private things I am doing.

While the are at it, they should look into TweetToilet, TweetShower, and TweetTP. Why not let the world know... dawning of a new age!

C

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Probably not
Cadman-LT   5/17/2013 11:00:13 PM
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Cabe, too funny! Just because there CAN be an app for that doesn't mean there SHOULD be!

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Intimate remote tracking
Rob Spiegel   5/15/2013 10:43:59 AM
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This is great, Jenn. You can get a call when your baby needs changing even when you're at work. When my kids were young, I loved those diapers that coagulated moisture into a solid within the diaper so the baby wouldn't feel uncomfortable because from the acidic moisture. Under those conditions, who needs the moisture dector?

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Intimate remote tracking
tekochip   5/15/2013 2:07:03 PM
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I always wanted to make a TV commercial with a toddler walking beside a pool, the kid falls in the pool and everyone rushes to his aid, only to see the kid happily sitting at the bottom of dry pool with a puddle here or there and a diaper that's swollen to the size of a beach ball. "Your child will always stay dry in new super absorbent Nappies"


Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Intimate remote tracking
Rob Spiegel   5/16/2013 12:01:19 PM
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Great idea for a commercial, Tekochip. From personal experience, I can testify these diapers really do work well.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Maybe
Charles Murray   5/15/2013 6:54:28 PM
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I'd give this idea a definite maybe. At one time, we had four young children with two in diapers at the same time. Admittedly, there were times when my communication link to my children was overloaded. I could have used a little help. At the same time, though, I'm not sure I would have been completely open to Tweets during the chaos. It might have pushed me over the brink.

Jennifer Campbell
User Rank
Gold
Re: Maybe
Jennifer Campbell   5/16/2013 10:09:23 AM
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I know exactly what you mean, Chuck. One crying child is stressful enough without the phone ringing, something beeping or anything else that demands your immediate attention. When my daughter was a baby, she wore diapers that had a yellow line on them. That line changed color when her diaper was wet. As the months went by, I started to be able to tell when he diaper was dirty, simply by looking at it.

 

jhmumford
User Rank
Gold
Re: Maybe
jhmumford   5/16/2013 2:59:16 PM
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Well, it's a little creepy, but is it any creepier than executing a "crotch grab" on a toddler to check if the diaper is wet?  Before I had kids, the first time I saw a parent execute that move on a three-year-old, it kind of freaked me out a little.  Then I had kids of my own and realized it's actually a really practical way to check for wetness.  If done well, this sensor (basically just a bluetooth moisture sensor, I think) could be helpful, since in my experience the kid won't cry until long after the diaper is wet (after it starts to get cold or skin irritation begins).  Seriously, they seem to not be bothered at all by a wet diaper.  I guess it's the warmth.  By the time they cry, a rash has already set in, and I recall having to check early and often.  And getting peed on a few times.  For some reason kids find that extremely funny.

Bob W
User Rank
Iron
Another Use
Bob W   5/16/2013 8:34:44 AM
A better use might be nursing homes or senior care facilities. The alarm sent to the nurses station could be very helpful. Some residents are non-verbal, some suffer from various mental difficulties that may prevent them from knowing that they have "moistened their under garments". I think most parents do learn the different cries but babies aren't the only ones wearing diapers anymore.

Jennifer Campbell
User Rank
Gold
Re: Another Use
Jennifer Campbell   5/16/2013 10:06:25 AM
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I think that is a very good point, Bob W, and one that I didn't think of.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Another Use
Charles Murray   5/16/2013 1:28:46 PM
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Great idea, BobW. I think you're definitely onto something.

OLD_CURMUDGEON
User Rank
Platinum
OK!, So what's next????
OLD_CURMUDGEON   5/16/2013 9:06:25 AM
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To parahrase an oft-referenced quote, "Technology is taking us where no man dared venture before!"  Not only will future generations of humans be born WITHOUT vocal chords to actually speak to one another (tweeting & nonverbal communication wll supplant that archaic mode), but they will be born without brains, since they'll be an "app" for that too. 

The ONLY exception to this prophecy will be for politicians.  A genetic marker will identify those individuals who have this dominant gene, and they will continue to have vocal chords, since that's ALL they know how to do.... talk, without reason!

CLMcDade
User Rank
Gold
moisture detectors
CLMcDade   5/16/2013 10:03:31 AM
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When I was remodeling my house, i wanted stainless steel hoses to lessen the chance of a burst hose and the subsequent flood damage.  As an aside, my contractor mentioned that there are moisture detectors that can send a signal to one's phone or alarm system to let she/he know that something is flooding.  He said that he had installed the detectors for other customers, usually around the dishwashers, washing machines and refrigerators.

As someone who dodged a flood from a burst rubber hose feeding a filter to the ice tray only because I came home from work early that day, this technology as a moisture warning system makes great sense.

That someone would think to extend it to baby diapers is a pretty straight line, to be honest.  Whether it is appropriate or not, that seems to be in the eye of the beholder. 

I agree that there is already a great moisture alarm system (the baby itself) and that there are positive developmental aspects to this system, but I find that a lot of the comments in this forum against the device are very judgmental and a little self-righteous, strongly ridiculing the imaginary parents who might use such a device.

If one dials down the indignation, one could arrive at the related use and the very real problem that Bob W. pointed out - nursing homes and assisted living facilities.  The need there is very real and is not a product of a lack of attention, selfishness on the part of the caregiver or part of the self-development of the party with the wet garment. 

So a big Bravo to Bob for not getting caught up in the negative thread of the commentary.  I lived through the nursing home nightmare with my father and using the moisture detector in this application didn't occur to me because I was too busy reeling from the negative comments (and laughing at Tekochip's commercial idea).

 

btwolfe
User Rank
Gold
Where does the phone go?
btwolfe   5/16/2013 10:48:21 AM
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So let me get this straight: you plug the moisture sensor into your phone, run the pee app, stick the sensor in the diaper and put the phone... where? Are diapers going to have a phone holster? Does my infant need a data plan for this? If my kid pees a lot, am I going to run the risk of going over my data plan limits?

Honestly though, I can see this concept being useful in hospital/daycare situations as others have suggested, but to need a phone for this is just a solution in search of a problem. There ought to be far simpler solutions that don't require connectivity to the internet and would cost considerably less. I think a simple mesh network with a centralized data collection system would be cheaper, simpler, and less expensive.

Nuvation
User Rank
Iron
Of course we don't need it...
Nuvation   5/17/2013 5:39:18 PM
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But we all know that new parents will buy ANYTHING! I bet the tweetPee would sell like hotcakes!

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Of course we don't need it...
Cadman-LT   5/17/2013 11:04:51 PM
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Nuvation, I agree..they will buy anything and everything that can benefit the child. No problem there. I just do not think this qualifies as one of those things. Technology should not replace good old fashioned parenting. That whole idea kinda scares me.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Of course we don't need it...
William K.   5/29/2013 4:18:18 PM
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Nuvation is quite right, I think. Such a device would sell as fast as it went on the shelves. Not prinmarily because of the function, but because of the :cool" factor. That is just the way some consumer products work.

Now as for all of those frightfully neurotic folks in a panic about the safety of the device. NO, it will not be safe! Clearly the communists will modify the RF generation circuits to modify the baby's genetic code so that it becomes a republican when it grows up. Anybody could see that as the only possible reason for selling such a product.

matalan1
User Rank
Iron
How about electromagnetic signal emmission?
matalan1   5/17/2013 5:45:23 PM
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I wouldn't put a radio signal emitter close to a baby's sensitive part. It may have some effect on a newborn.

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Re: How about electromagnetic signal emmission?
Cadman-LT   5/17/2013 11:15:32 PM
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matalan1, I agree. Even if it turns out to be safe, would you want to be the one to find out? Not me.

ChuckHall
User Rank
Iron
Attention Deficit
ChuckHall   5/19/2013 7:01:42 AM
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Seems to me that parents are paying more attention to their smartphones than to their children. Mother Nature has already given parents all the tools they need. Look, feel, sniff, and listen. But if you wait too long to use the first three and made your baby cry, then shame on you!

Sorry if I posted this wrong.

BG
User Rank
Iron
#2!!!
BG   5/29/2013 4:12:42 PM
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What is far more valuable, as a father of 6, would be a method for detecting #2 in the diaper.  #2 lingering for any length of time is the main cause for irritation/rash/pain, in my experience. 

This would be worth a high price, to me.  Happy backside = happy baby = happy parents.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: #2!!!
Cabe Atwell   5/30/2013 1:05:44 AM
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BG,

You might have something there. Keeping on top of the chores of parenthood could help, bigtime.

However...

Matalan1 has a point. Drowning a newborn in today's wireless world, that close, at all times is not good.

C



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