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jamaniery
User Rank
Iron
84" touch display
jamaniery   7/31/2013 7:27:41 PM
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I agree with some of the above comments.  Prices will decrease for 4K resolution paired with 84" monitors over time.  With the price tag today only a select market is capable of purchasing these displays.  Here is another interesting article highlighting touch screen and 4k content

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Bigger than Microsoft
Cabe Atwell   6/10/2013 7:31:25 PM
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Ah... but they are not 84 inches.

I think the display doesn't have to be that price. Who would actually buy that? Most will wait until the price is more reasonable. Alvaro should just start at the lower price.

C

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Bigger than Microsoft
Rob Spiegel   6/4/2013 5:10:25 PM
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That's pretty steep Cabe. The Microsoft touch display -- while a bit smaller -- is in the $15,000 to $20,000 range.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Bigger than Microsoft
Cabe Atwell   5/29/2013 11:59:07 PM
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Jack,

I did forget to mention. The opening market price will be at $43,000.

Not really feasible for many.

C

far911
User Rank
Silver
Fine peice of engineering
far911   5/26/2013 5:15:06 AM
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A multi-touch display boasting an 84-inch screen and an ultra-HD resolution is some fine piece of engineering and a marvel in its own right. The touch response time is mighty impressive as well. Considering that it also comes with a toughened safety glass for panel protection, the makers have left very little to complain about. Support for stereoscopic 3D would've been the icing on the cake. The only barrier to entry is the hefty price tag.

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Bigger than Microsoft
Jack Rupert, PE   5/21/2013 3:39:34 PM
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It often amazing reviewing older movies and seeing today's technologies before they were developed.  Great clip you got there, I had forgotten some of that.


On your other comment, have you heard what the price is?  I'm sure it's extreme, but then again, the display that is currently sitting on my desk was unaffordable just a few years back....

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Bigger than Microsoft
Cabe Atwell   5/17/2013 3:38:09 PM
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The Minority Report scene was more of a demonstration of a 3D HMI.

Watching the early "gestures" were interesting. Even had pinch to zoom in 2002.

C



Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Technical hurdle?
Cabe Atwell   5/17/2013 3:31:17 PM
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Chuck,

There have been large touchscreen for some time. They were called "Microsoft Surface" at that time. Now that name is used for smaller screens. They sported up to 32 inputs. Some even had depth sensing, if I recall.

However, this size is unprecedented. I am sure the price would shock as well.

C

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Bigger than Microsoft
Rob Spiegel   5/16/2013 3:51:48 PM
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Yes, there were touch screens in Minority Report. I don't remember them in Back to the Future II. Mostly I've seen them -- real ones -- in political maps during campaigns. Chuck Todd, among others, is very good at using one effectively.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Bigger than Microsoft
Charles Murray   5/15/2013 7:15:57 PM
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Rob, wasn't there a movie called Minority Report (with Tom Cruise) where they used giant touch screens? I'm also wondering if they used a giant touch screen in part two of Back to the Future. The future always seems to get depicted with giant touch screens.

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