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Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: NASA does it again
Elizabeth M   5/6/2013 9:41:00 AM
NO RATINGS
Indeed, Ann, I think this may also have to do with some of the budget concerns NASA has had. Always a bastion of R&D, the agency now has to do more with less. So perhaps it's far better for them to specialize for specific tasks in their robotics research since they don't have the luxury of R&D for R&D's sake anymore. I will check out that slideshow! Partnering up seems to also be a good tactic to keep NASA R&D alive and as innovative as it's always been.

Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Re: Cool robot
Debera Harward   5/4/2013 6:05:34 AM
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Ahan Nasa is doing great work , But i have one question this Robot would have been created for a specific surface level and what i think is that over their its not necessary that all the area has the same surface i mean to say the size of the sand granulaes and pebbles may varry as well as this is a nature and nothing cant be constant .So what have they done in order to over come this issue as the robot can stuck as well because of large pebbels .

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Cool robot
Jack Rupert, PE   5/3/2013 5:15:41 PM
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Of course then we could have a reclamation project for the moon like all the major earth-bound mines have (at least in the US).  We could send our un-recyclables back to even our the mass changes.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cool robot
Cabe Atwell   5/3/2013 3:54:10 PM
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Good idea. Time to strip-mine the moon and fire bolts of ore back to the Earth.

Let's say we mine a trillion tons of ore from the moon and asteroids, adding the Earth's mass. Would that eventually slow the momentum, orbit, etc of the planet? I would imagine, since we would add more mass than there would ever be on the planet in our lifetime. (barring a major collision.)

C

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cool robot
Rob Spiegel   5/3/2013 3:28:15 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, I wonder if this machine is a precursor to mining projects. If we find sufficient valuable metals and elements on the Moon or Mars, than vehicles like this could do the mining with minimally manned ships picking up the payloads and bringing them home.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
HARSH environment
TJ McDermott   5/2/2013 11:11:46 PM
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Vacuum.  Extreme temperature swings.  And that dust.  In some ways, the dust is the worst part of the problem.

The lunar astronauts reentered their landers covered in it; pristine white space suits greyed almost black.  It got everywhere.

This is going to be an interesting subject to follow in the coming years.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Mining Robot
Charles Murray   5/2/2013 8:07:26 PM
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Maybe I missed it, but I wonder if this robot has a rechargeable battery. If so, how does it recharge?

apresher
User Rank
Blogger
Mining Robot
apresher   5/2/2013 5:25:44 PM
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Excellent story, Ann.  Leave it to NASA to come up with a robot that digs effectively.  The barrel design is definitely very interesting as a way to overcome the lack of gravity.  Definitely a different type of design problem.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cool robot
Ann R. Thryft   5/2/2013 1:18:40 PM
NO RATINGS
Agreed, Rob. Although there are also some constraints of Curiosity it doesn't have--those that would involve sensitive scientific instrumentation--and others it has that Curiosity doesn't, such as some mechanical design for soil scooping.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Cool robot
Rob Spiegel   5/2/2013 12:53:18 PM
NO RATINGS
Wonderful, story, Ann. One thing this robot shares with the Mars Rover is the long list of constraints that the engineers need to manage in development. This type of project brings out the creativity in the design engineer.

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