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Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Question
Charles Murray   5/1/2013 9:54:32 PM
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Thanks AnandY. I knew of a family whose son had an epileptic seizure after playing hours of a computerized basketball game.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Product improvement
Rob Spiegel   5/1/2013 4:34:26 PM
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Good questions, Manning6. From your assessment, it seems the LED lights would last about half as long as they would without the flicker correction. If the flickering bothers you, this may be a reasonable trade-off.

Ralphy Boy
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Product improvement
Ralphy Boy   5/1/2013 3:55:07 PM
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My ex has epilepsy. One year we both fell into the Christmas Tree as she had a seizure and I tried to catch her. I would suggest that the makers of AC LED lighting be very careful about flickering. Flickering lights can be a trigger for epileptic seizures.

Without researching the issue I'd guess that LEDs have a sharper on/off brightness response than a heated wire does.  

On another note, I've taken night shots at the drag races; the ones where I slow the exposure and follow the cars have clear car images, blurred stationary stuff (fences and guard rails for instance), and stretched out multi-pulsed images of the high wattage track lights... The first time I saw it it was a surprise.

icefield
User Rank
Bronze
Re: One warning
icefield   5/1/2013 11:50:30 AM
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@D. Sherman.

16-2/3Hz is still used in some European railway systems. It's a pain when trying to filter magnetometer signals at 50/60Hz to then also have to worry about the lower (indeed more troublesome) noise.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Product improvement
Elizabeth M   5/1/2013 8:55:41 AM
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Annother ingenious fix from one of our great gadget geeks. I will keep this in mind for when Xmas season rolls around again and I want some energy efficient, non-headache-inducing lights!

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Product improvement
NadineJ   4/30/2013 11:32:34 PM
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AnandY-That's true.  Here in San Francisco, Halloween lights are very popular.  And, many use the lights inside year-round for ambience and outside for parties. 

KenL
User Rank
Gold
Re: Safety
KenL   4/30/2013 11:03:30 PM
NO RATINGS
You could just spend a little more, and buy strings that are made as full wave, and already have UL listing.

http://www.holidayleds.com/articles/led_full_wave_christmas_lights

http://www.holidayleds.com/what_does_rectified_or_full_wave_mean

 

Here's a photo that shows that full wave still flickers (at 120Hz)

http://www.habsch.ca/flicker.jpg

 

szyhxc
User Rank
Iron
Re: One warning
szyhxc   4/30/2013 7:21:23 PM
NO RATINGS
All outdoor uses should be GFI protected. 

szyhxc
User Rank
Iron
Re: One warning
szyhxc   4/30/2013 6:49:54 PM
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I agree with D Sherman.  In my household I am the only one who deals with electrical Christmas decorations so I was not concerned.  Using the slavaged plug from a scrapped string of mini lights will give 3 amp protection for most erroneously pluged in devices.  Plugging in a string of incandescent mini lights will not be a problem.  I have done this and they work OK.

szyhxc
User Rank
Iron
Re: This can be even better
szyhxc   4/30/2013 6:32:37 PM
NO RATINGS
I was going for cheap and I found it.

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