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Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Cost comparisons
Rob Spiegel   4/25/2013 11:39:05 AM
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Hey Greg, if elastomers are gaining on wire rope isolators, what is the savings? Is it considerable? Do the wire rope isolators come with superior endurance?

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Cost comparisons
William K.   4/29/2013 2:37:11 PM
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Rob, I am sure that elasomer isolators arena lot cheaper than the wire rope versions, but that is if only the purchase price is considered. But where the cost of failure is high the wire rope devices suddenly seem to be a far better choice. In addition, they can survive under a leaky hydraulic power unit, while an elastomeric isolator has the elastomer become a very sticky and messy mush, which does not isolate vibration or even hold the power unit in the correct position. At that point the cable isolator became a much less expensive choice.

Greg Herman
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Blogger
Re: Cost comparisons
Greg Herman   5/3/2013 11:21:52 AM
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Hi Rob,

In most cases the savings is realized from the longevity of the wire rope isolator. Elastomeric mounts are replaced by wire rope isolators when they fail in order to prevent future downtime and replacement costs.  The wire rope isolators are sized to operate below the fatigue limit of the stainless steel cable, providing theoretically infinite fatigue life.  This, along with the corrosion resistance of the unit provides superior endurance in many applications.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Blogger
Looks SUPER robust - Never seen one before
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   4/25/2013 5:22:26 PM
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I'm kind of embarrassed to say, after 30 years as a design engineer, I've never seen one of these.  Great idea, for all the points listed by Greg.  Yes, I have had elastomers fail for various reasons (primarily vibration cycling, and extreme low temperatures – even exposure to UV), but these rope isolators really look like a clever way to create a strong, flexible, long-lasting solutions.  Been around for 30 years-?  I didn't notice a fabricator's name mentioned ,,,,,

BobDJr
User Rank
Gold
Re: Looks SUPER robust - Never seen one before
BobDJr   4/26/2013 9:16:55 AM
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@JimT: Fortunately, before beginning my 30 years as a design engineer in earnest, I served on a Navy command & control ship full of receivers and transmitters.  We had a pair of 5kW AM transmitters that were mounted on these, and those cabinets (IIRC) were really big: about 4 feet by 4 feet at the base and probably 6-7 feet tall.

(Check out the link to ITT Enidine at the end of the article - they make these things.)

Cheers,

Bob

notarboca
User Rank
Gold
Re: Looks SUPER robust - Never seen one before
notarboca   4/30/2013 4:20:10 PM
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Thanks for the article, Greg.  I had always thought of dampening with elastomer, or hydraulic/pneumatic absorbers.  Learning some thought provoking ideas today.  I can think of a number of application where these could be useful.

Shelly
User Rank
Iron
Size matters
Shelly   4/26/2013 9:24:21 AM
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These wire rope isolators are an excellent idea when you have the space to use them, although they do make them small enough to hold on your finger-tip.  If you are working on relatively small products, and size (and weight) matters, elastomers are always considered first, to isolate a small PCB, for instance.  Another option is Lodengraf damping, to absorb higher frequency vibrations.  Vibration isolation is a big business, and there are many options.  It will depend on the application.  Thank you for bringing this option to the forefront.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Wire rope isolators.
William K.   4/26/2013 6:35:19 PM
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Another benefit not mentioned is that the wire rope isolators are quite resistant to most petroleum products, although I suspect that oil immersion would reduce the damping a bit. But after seeing some rubber shock mounts just sort of melt away, the wire ones look good.

Pubudu
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Wire rope isolators.
Pubudu   4/29/2013 1:14:29 AM
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Greg thanks for the article, Actually this is new to me thou you mention it was there for last 30 years in the market.

Kindly let me know (at least some links) the practical application of that wire rope isolator,



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