HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 3/6  >  >>
Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Nautical robots of all shapes and sizes.
Ann R. Thryft   5/2/2013 11:39:20 AM
NO RATINGS
William, the material is described as "fortified" Styrofoam, so I doubt it resembles much the stuff used in shipping containers.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Variety of water worthy robots
Ann R. Thryft   5/1/2013 12:15:07 PM
NO RATINGS
I think you're right, Rob. The two things I noticed that came up again and again in underwater robot design were, of course, seals and water-tight protection of electronics etc., but also movement through water and how differently it must be engineered than movement through air. That said, most of these robots' purpose is neither speed nor maneuverability but to carry out certain research or military functions, usually some kind of surveillance or data gathering. Speed and maneuverability are generally secondary or even tertiary goals, with one or two exceptions, for instance, the robots that have to squeeze into tight spaces, such as this robotic tuna: http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=251209

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Variety of water worthy robots
Rob Spiegel   4/30/2013 11:50:43 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, if shape matters underwater, I would imagine we'll see more and more robots that take a lead from nature. How that will play out will probably depend on the purpose of the robot -- whether it's intended for speed or maneuverability.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Nautical robots of all shapes and sizes.
William K.   4/30/2013 9:18:50 PM
NO RATINGS
Of course it could be t6hat the material is just descriped as "styrofoam" even though it is one of those inorganic silicon based materials, or even a whote ceramic foam. And possibly purchasing substituted something"just as good".

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Nautical robots of all shapes and sizes.
Ann R. Thryft   4/30/2013 12:05:31 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks, William, glad you enjoyed the slideshow. I had the same reaction to the Styrofoam material on hydrocarbon lakes on Titan's moon. But this *IS* a prototype, and that material will no doubt be changed out along the way, after some of the basic ME design is under control.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Anti-submarine warfare
Ann R. Thryft   4/30/2013 12:04:06 PM
NO RATINGS
Chuck, I'm with you. After seeing Cameron's The Abyss again, I'm reminded of my claustrophobia. I'm definitely not a candidate for submarine duty.

Dangela
User Rank
Bronze
Re: cool stuff
Dangela   4/29/2013 12:54:16 PM
NO RATINGS
Images 1 through 12 each have a link as well. I'm suggesting having that link point to the next page. Now, on the page with image 10 on it for example, the image has a link to the current page with image 10 on it and "next" has a link to the next page with image 11 on it. Can't the image point to the next page also?

Measurementblues
User Rank
Silver
Re: Nautical robot designed by students
Measurementblues   4/29/2013 12:53:06 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, glad to help. Feel free to post relevant DesignNews links in a comment. BTW, the link I provided (repeated below) has links to three other robotics blogs.

Students Design Underwater Robot

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: cool stuff
Ann R. Thryft   4/29/2013 12:37:09 PM
NO RATINGS
Dangela, clicking on the picture in the article starts the slideshow: it should open a new window and you'll see slide numbers at the top--Image 1 through 12--with a Next link.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Nautical robot designed by students
Ann R. Thryft   4/29/2013 12:36:15 PM
NO RATINGS
Martin, thanks for the link. Maybe I can include that one in the next nautical robot slideshow.

<<  <  Page 3/6  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Adam Berger hacked a computer keyboard into a mini key-tar to play with his band.
Altair has released an update of its HyperWorks computer-aided engineering simulation suite that includes new features focusing on four key areas of product design: performance optimization, lightweight design, lead-time reduction, and new technologies.
At IMTS last week, Stratasys introduced two new multi-materials PolyJet 3D printers, plus a new UV-resistant material for its FDM production 3D printers. They can be used in making jigs and fixtures, as well as prototypes and small runs of production parts.
In a line of ultra-futuristic projects, DARPA is developing a brain microchip that will help heal the bodies and minds of soldiers. A final product is far off, but preliminary chips are already being tested.
If you're planning to develop a product that uses a microcontroller, you'll want to take note of next week's Design News Continuing Education course, "MCU Software Development A Step-by-Step Guide."
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Sep 22 - 26, MCU Software Development A Step-by-Step Guide (Using a Real Eval Board)
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service