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Jim_E
User Rank
Platinum
to defend *oot
Jim_E   4/24/2013 10:31:35 AM
NO RATINGS
That's crazy that there were plastic socket drive parts, and such small gauge jumper wires!

But, I have to defend the mentioned *oot site.  I've bought many items from there over the years, and like anywhere else, you have to know what you're buying.  I like my "leakfrog" water detectors that I got from that site, and I've even bought my first flat screen TV from there and haven't had any problems with the stuff.

Besides, where else can you buy a random "Bag Of Crap"?  :)

bob from maine
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Advice
bob from maine   4/24/2013 10:27:18 AM
NO RATINGS
I have, over the course of a 50 year career doing every job imaginable, consistently regretted purchasing cheap tools. I still have and use Snap-On mechanic's tools purchased 35 years ago. After melting a few sets of jumper cables, I made a 30' set of #1 tinned copper with tin-plated clamps. Cost was around $100 just in materials, but these cables have jump-started diesel trucks, bulldozers, boats, heated frozen fasteners using a carbon rod and are still as good as the day I made them. The 'jumper' cables that plug into a cigarette lighter socket will charge a dead battery given enough time (to charge a 100AH battery that is dead ideally takes 5 hours at 20 Amps, two and a half hours to get it to 50%) and that's assuming you don't blow the lighter fuse. They are a fire hazard though and can really shouldn't be sold as "jumper" cables. The cheapest "jumper" cable set you'll ever buy is a Triple A membership.

shrimper53
User Rank
Gold
Re: Fusible Link
shrimper53   4/24/2013 10:03:59 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm surprised the whole damn thing didn't melt or light up when you tried it.  I've always noted the latent heat in the cables after I've used my good, heavy gauge ones to do a jump start.   

OLD_CURMUDGEON
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Advice
OLD_CURMUDGEON   4/24/2013 9:36:10 AM
NO RATINGS
I've had relatives in the family (most now deceased!) that WOULD NOT spend the extra "dime" to buy high quality tools.  They'd always buy the least expensive, cheapest-looking tool, and then RE-buy them when they failed after brief use.  The irony of this is that in each case, the person was very successful in life, both financially & otherwise.  So, who's to say or criticize??????

Battar
User Rank
Platinum
Advice
Battar   4/24/2013 8:57:54 AM
Advice my father gave me for buying tools - "find the cheapest tool in the shop - and DON'T BUY THAT ONE". It's a mistake to try and save pennies on cheap tools.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Fusible Link
TJ McDermott   4/24/2013 2:19:51 AM
NO RATINGS
It's likely that you'd simply have melted the cable if it was of such small gauge.  Not just cheaply constructed, but downright dangerous.

Noor Khalsa
User Rank
Iron
Re: Dire circumstances
Noor Khalsa   4/23/2013 3:20:08 PM
NO RATINGS
I have to agree re: contingencies. The story gets better: the emergency kit came with a "socket set", 1/4" drive. Small, cheapie sockets that are driven by a plastic-handled drive. I tried to use them to remove the 10mm nut on my battery post, and the plastic handle broke away from the metal shaft on the first try. BTW, I'm not going to name the website where he bought it, but it rhymes with POOT.

far911
User Rank
Silver
Dire circumstances
far911   4/23/2013 9:55:37 AM
NO RATINGS
I guess the lesson to be learned from this is never to go cheap when you're planning for contingencies. More likely, never to buy stuff off of phishy websites.

I got a VGA Box once which was produced by some unknown Chinese vendor. No doubt the device died out on me after a month's usage.

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