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far911
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Blockbusters
far911   4/23/2013 9:44:05 AM
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Of all these people, the ones who got into the filmmaking business are really inspirational. Those, and the sports folks. Primarily because their careers are far fetched from their education history.

Charles Murray
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Re: Blockbusters
Charles Murray   4/23/2013 10:36:28 AM
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I agree. I also find it interesting that in Frank Capra's best-known film, It's a Wonderful Life, the main character, George Bailey, dreamed of being a civil engineer.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Blockbusters
Rob Spiegel   4/23/2013 11:26:32 AM
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Nice slide show,. Chuck. Yes, that's right about George Bailey. He wanted to travel the world, then come home and build things. The most surprising one on the list for me is Hitchcock.

Charles Murray
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Re: Blockbusters
Charles Murray   4/23/2013 11:34:43 AM
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Hitchcock surprised me, too, Rob. I thought I had heard of most of the famous engineers over the years, but Hitchcock's name had never come up previously, at least for me.

jacksos1
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Interesting read...I was almost wondering
jacksos1   4/23/2013 12:14:09 PM
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if the title should be changed to 18 MEN who we didn't know were engineers until I saw the last image.  I guess we don't have as many female engineers doing other high exposure stuff besides engineering (which is cool on it's own!) :)

Susan (Chemical Engineer working in Corporate Communications)

Charles Murray
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Re: Interesting read...I was almost wondering
Charles Murray   4/23/2013 1:31:39 PM
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I'm not sure why the male/female ratio came out the way it did, jacksos1. There could be a lot of contributing factors, but we certainly didn't try to limit the search to men only. I think the story of Hedy Lamarr might be revealing, however. Today, a great technical mind like hers would likely be encouraged to consider engineering instead of acting. The fact that we drew several of our candidates from that era might have had an effect on the ratio. Whatever the reasons, though, the fact that she didn't have an engineering education makes her achievement all the more amazing. 

Debera Harward
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Re: Interesting read...I was almost wondering
Debera Harward   4/23/2013 2:29:54 PM
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Surprisingly Yaser Arfat was a civil engineer from university of Cairo

Neil Armstrong has also done BS in aeronautical engineering and MS in aerospace engineering

Roger Corman a film maker has done industrial engineering from Stanfford university

 

Charles Murray
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Re: Interesting read...I was almost wondering
Charles Murray   4/23/2013 8:40:12 PM
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Those are good ones, Debera. If we get enough as good as those, maybe we can do a part 2.

TJ McDermott
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Re: Interesting read...I was almost wondering
TJ McDermott   4/24/2013 2:02:54 AM
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Charles, thank you for a glimpse of history.  This was quite an interesting article.  I didn't know there were ANY engineers in congress; maybe more engineers and fewer lawyers might improve the workflow in DC.

shrimper53
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Re: Interesting read...I was almost wondering
shrimper53   4/24/2013 9:54:48 AM
TJ, you are SOOOOOO right.  Although I think too, in a number of the cases... (i.e. Carter , Hoover....)  we may have all been way better off if they 'd stuck to the educational roots....

Very interesting article, Charles.. highly enjoyable....! Hitchcock was indeed the biggest surprise to me.

 

Charles Murray
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Re: Interesting read...I was almost wondering
Charles Murray   4/25/2013 7:28:04 PM
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There are a few engineers in Congress, TJ. I was amazed, however, to learn from commenter Dave Palmer that there are 15 engineers in Congress. I now know of a couple others -- Cliff Stearns (who was recently voted out) and Dan Lipinski of Illinois. But 15 surprised me. Thanks to Dave Palmer for that info.

Dave Palmer
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Re: Interesting read...I was almost wondering
Dave Palmer   4/23/2013 4:24:38 PM
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@jacksos1: Unfortunately, 1 out of 18 more or less reflects the proportion of women engineers as a whole (at least when it comes to mechanical and electrical engineering -- some fields, like chemical or industrial engineering, have a somewhat higher proportion of women).  And several decades ago, which is when most of these people were active, the proportion was even lower.

I recently submitted an article about engineers in the U.S. Congress, which hopefully will be published soon.  Joe Barton, who is included in Chuck's slideshow, is one, but there are a total of 15 in the current Congress; none of them are women. 

Charles Murray
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Re: Interesting read...I was almost wondering
Charles Murray   4/23/2013 8:42:22 PM
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That's what I was afraid of, Dave. The percentage of women in engineering used to be accepted at around 10%. I don't know if it has gone up in recent years, but in the days of Hedy Lamarr and Alfred Hitchcock, it was certainly lower.

Nancy Golden
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Re: Interesting read...I was almost wondering
Nancy Golden   4/24/2013 1:43:13 PM
I noticed some folks get upset about the male-female ratios in engineering, but as a female engineer it never much bothered me. While I have had my share of dealing with "good ole boys" (you can get your own coffee and I take mine black, thank you very much) I have found that there is always opportunities for those who truly want them, at least in my own personal experience. Competence typically beats out gender bias and in today's culture I think folks gravitate towards what they are interested in. Just seems to be more guys are interested in engineering then gals, but then girls are usually more interested in interior design...

NadineJ
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Re: Interesting read...I was almost wondering
NadineJ   4/25/2013 12:55:45 PM
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Nancy-Maybe it's a generational thing.  I don't know.  But, I was taught that anyone should have the opportunity to follow their strengths.  It's not male vs female.  But, there are some truths that are often ignored.  Girls are interested and skilled in science and engineering but women have few opportunities.

Comments like "Just seems to be more guys are interested in engineering then gals, but then girls are usually more interested in interior design..." just seem really counterproductive and feeds the stereotyping that sets up road blocks.

Nancy Golden
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Re: Interesting read...I was almost wondering
Nancy Golden   4/25/2013 1:37:10 PM
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Hi Nadine - I appreciate your comment and I certainly see your perspective. However, I am simply speaking from my own experiences. I grew up as a "tomboy" and I was the only girl the boys would let play soccer at recess and I was usually one of the first picked. This speaks to my statement that regardless of the venue - typically competence will override gender bias. But it has also been my experience (I have been in engineering for twenty years) that striking up a conversation about hall effects is rather difficult with other women (and some men of course). I did not mean that statement to be stereotypical as a limiting factor, because we should all have the freedom to break through stereotypes, but I also believe that if I am in a fire and need someone to rescue me - I will have more confidence if the rescue worker who appears is a 250 lb. person of physical muscular strength. While I don't deny that can take the shape of a female rescue worker - the likelihood of that being the case is fairly slim. God made each of us unique with different gifts - but some gifts seem a little more lopsided towards one gender or the other, although of course that is not always the case. Part of it is how our educational system is structured as well - girls and boys mature at different rates yet they receive instruction in math and science at the same age - studies have been done that show this may have a negative effect on learning for girls in these areas which could account for some of the stereotypical views we are discussing.

I absolutely embrace and applaud women in engineering - I was asked to be a guest speaker at a seminar for high school counselors on that very topic. I know some other female engineers that absolutely excel. And I do stand on my statement - a woman can achieve her dream to be an engineer (or anything else for that matter) if she has the potential it requires to do so, as well as the attitude it takes to persevere. Competence overcomes gender bias. But my observation comes from being the ONLY woman engineer in a large semiconductor firm that was willing to hire women in engineering. At one point I was test engineering manager and in a position to hire - but did not ever receive women applicants. The majority of the ladies I interact with at church and social functions aren't interested in technical topics, but I can strike up a conversation with a non-technical guy and he will usually have a passing interest. Sorry for the seemingly stereotyping - maybe it is just my generation, Nadine. I am glad there are folks like you that are standing up for women in science and engineering.

r3son8tr
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Re: Blockbusters
r3son8tr   4/24/2013 9:42:42 AM
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the moral of this story is "Get the degree but don't enter the field if you want to succeed". Interesting that only one person featured in the article actually created something technical (Hedy Lamarr) but wasn't trained as an engineer, all of the others avoided the field entirely.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Blockbusters
Rob Spiegel   4/25/2013 6:47:14 AM
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One of the things that is interesting about Hitchcock as an engineer is that you can't see it in his movies. You can see the technocrat tendencies in Carter's presidency. He seemed more focused on solving problems than he was on selling the resulting solutions poitically.  That's very engineer. But I don't see the engineer in Hitchcock's work.

NadineJ
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Re: Blockbusters
NadineJ   4/25/2013 1:01:12 PM
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From my understanding of his work, Hitchcock planned and controlled every detail.  He was very methodical.  Today, the special effects in a movie like The Birds seem underwhelming, but at the time, it was awesome.  Consider the shower scene in Psycho.  There was nothing like before.  I can see it in the precision in his decisions and process.

Nancy Golden
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Re: Blockbusters
Nancy Golden   4/25/2013 1:48:44 PM
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After watching an Alfred Hitchcock flick – one can become a little jumpy...I saw this in an email joke the other day and had to laugh:

"Dear paranoid people who check behind your showers for murderers, if you do find one, what's your plan?"

I must admit I have shoved the shower curtain aside in the past to check for an intruder, with no idea of what I would have done if I found one...

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Blockbusters
Rob Spiegel   4/25/2013 7:51:43 PM
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Thanks Nadine. I knew somebody would challenge me when I noted I didn't see the engineer in Hitchcock's work. Perhaps he gets the extra credit for making his engineering approach seem natural and un-engineered.

JerrySteiger
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Re: Blockbusters
JerrySteiger   5/16/2013 3:19:02 PM
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Pol Pot studied reputedly studied electrical engineering in France, but never gradutated. 

Charles Murray
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John Sununu
Charles Murray   4/23/2013 11:12:06 AM
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My favorite line from any interview I've done over the past 29 years is John Sununu's: "No level of glibness can get you through a thermodynamics exam."

http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=223833

Debera Harward
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Re: John Sununu
Debera Harward   4/23/2013 11:20:53 AM
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I have come across many engineers having the passion of music and singing, I just simply cant relate between this combination.

Tom-R
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Re: John Sununu
Tom-R   10/11/2013 10:31:27 AM
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I agree that music and engineering seem too different to both interest the same person, but I'll admit I probably use only half my brain. The most brilliant people I know seem to be good at everything. They play instruments at the highest levels, and may work as surgeons during day. I met a medical student this fall that was an engineer first, and had built a company doing computer controls. Now he was becoming a doctor because he wanted to help society, instead of being part of the business rat race. You would think he would be busy enough with all his studies, but on the side he was helping to develop a program to better display medial research results for the doctors he was training under. I know he will never now as much about my field of engineering as I do, and he can ask the simplest of questions, but I also know he could have learned everything I know in about 1/10 the time it took me. So learning an instrument for him is just something to do, to understand and appreciate it better. Maybe I'll take up the harmonica....

Nancy Golden
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Re: John Sununu
Nancy Golden   4/24/2013 1:36:26 PM
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That quote - John Sununu's: "No level of glibness can get you through a thermodynamics exam" caught my attention as well. It certainly spreaks to the perseverence required to obtain an engineering degree and the character of folks who do...

apresher
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18 Engineers
apresher   4/23/2013 3:21:25 PM
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Chuck,  Very interesting grouping. Next, we'll need to request the list of 18 famous electrical engineers. Thanks.

Charles Murray
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Re: 18 Engineers
Charles Murray   4/25/2013 7:40:56 PM
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Good point, Al. I, too, was surprised that there were no electrical engineers on the list. I can't imagine why. I have actually bumped into a few other names since publishing the article, but none of those were EEs either.  

Elizabeth M
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News to me
Elizabeth M   4/24/2013 3:48:19 AM
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Thanks for this cool bit of information and retrospective, Chuck. A lot of this is news to me! I guess the moral of hte story is that engineering gives you a good basis for success in many areas! And it makes sense, given the intelligence and logic required. It sets the stage for all kinds of other skills, I think.

Charles Murray
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Re: News to me
Charles Murray   4/25/2013 7:20:17 PM
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I agree that engineering sets the stage for other skills, Liz. I also foun it interesting how many of our engineers used skills obtained at MIT: John H. Sununu; John E. Sununu; Tom Scholz and Pete Stark. That's a high percentage from a single school.   

Elizabeth M
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Re: News to me
Elizabeth M   4/26/2013 5:36:47 AM
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Well, I guess if you're going to get an engineering degree, you might as well go big. I would say MIT is the best you can get!

richnass
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Re: News to me
richnass   4/26/2013 7:39:27 AM
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Elizabeth, you'd better be careful with that one (saying that MIT is ther best you can get). I'm sure many people would debate that. You'd certainly have to define "best."

Charles Murray
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Re: News to me
Charles Murray   4/26/2013 5:52:27 PM
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Any thoughts on why we're not seeing any EEs on this list? Was there such a thing as an EE degree in Hitchcock's day?

Elizabeth M
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Re: News to me
Elizabeth M   4/29/2013 4:18:49 AM
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Ah, OK, I just sort of meant it anecdotally, Rich, as it seems like so much of the innovation we write about comes out of MIT. I am sure a case can be made for more than one institution to be the best...I certainly didn't mean to offend anyone at the other fine engineering universities out there!

Here is a link to someone's list of top undergraduate engineering schools...MIT is at the top but as you can see of course there are a number of other fine schools: http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/rankings/engineering

ChasChas
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No level of glibness......
ChasChas   4/24/2013 9:53:56 AM
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When you look at who contributes the most for the advancement of civilization, all these people "wasted their talents". They went for the buck, ego and fame instead of using their talent as they were meant to.

We can blame our society's value system. 

Our engineers are under-paid, under-appreciated, and treated like a commodity by the big ego sector - that claims all the credit.

Where would anybody be without engineers? There would be no use for any of these ex-engineer's alter talents.

John Sununu's: "No level of glibness can get you through a thermodynamics exam."

John pretty much says it all.

My soul is not for sale.

 

nobler
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You missed Mr. Bean
nobler   4/24/2013 10:03:58 AM
Rowan Sebastian Atkinson has his degree in electrical engineering from Oxford.  That should be all the explanation you need for Mr. Bean -- surely you have worked with one (or more) during your career!

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: You missed Mr. Bean
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   4/25/2013 12:43:40 AM
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Right, nobler --- Atkinson's "Mr Bean" is the icon of "nerdy" – Yes, I've worked with many who fit that mold!   But my surprise from the list was the dominant number of Athletes & Politicians.

esb
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another engineer out of his field
esb   4/24/2013 10:19:55 AM
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The smartest general you never heard of was the Australian, Sir John Monash.  As an engineer he built railroads, introduced reinforced concrete to Australia, and electrified the state of Victoria.  Oh, by the way, he also was an educator, a lawyer, and a concert pianist as well as being a "Saturday afternoon soldier", a reservist.  When World War One broke out he shipped out for Gallipoli and then, after being prehaps the last Aussie to leave the beach, he made his name on the Western Front.  In 1918 he took command of the Austrlian Corps and spearheded the "hundred days" assault that won the war.  He revolutionized tactics, never lost a battle, was given gredit by the Germans for inventing the blitzkrieg.  His meticulous planning, technical innovations (like air dropping ammunition to advancing troops), and attention to training made is diggers, man for man, about two and half times as effective as other units, as measured by ground captured, prisoners captured, and guns captured.  After the war, in addition to engineering, he was active in veterans' affairs (he sent his idle men to school, "inventing the GI bill"), boy scouts, and other civic afairs.  His face is on the Australian $100 bill. 

esb
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another engineer out of his field
esb   4/24/2013 10:20:05 AM
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The smartest general you never heard of was the Australian, Sir John Monash.  As an engineer he built railroads, introduced reinforced concrete to Australia, and electrified the state of Victoria.  Oh, by the way, he also was an educator, a lawyer, and a concert pianist as well as being a "Saturday afternoon soldier", a reservist.  When World War One broke out he shipped out for Gallipoli and then, after being prehaps the last Aussie to leave the beach, he made his name on the Western Front.  In 1918 he took command of the Austrlian Corps and spearheded the "hundred days" assault that won the war.  He revolutionized tactics, never lost a battle, was given gredit by the Germans for inventing the blitzkrieg.  His meticulous planning, technical innovations (like air dropping ammunition to advancing troops), and attention to training made is diggers, man for man, about two and half times as effective as other units, as measured by ground captured, prisoners captured, and guns captured.  After the war, in addition to engineering, he was active in veterans' affairs (he sent his idle men to school, "inventing the GI bill"), boy scouts, and other civic afairs.  His face is on the Australian $100 bill. 

esb
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another engineer out of his field
esb   4/24/2013 10:20:05 AM
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The smartest general you never heard of was the Australian, Sir John Monash.  As an engineer he built railroads, introduced reinforced concrete to Australia, and electrified the state of Victoria.  Oh, by the way, he also was an educator, a lawyer, and a concert pianist as well as being a "Saturday afternoon soldier", a reservist.  When World War One broke out he shipped out for Gallipoli and then, after being prehaps the last Aussie to leave the beach, he made his name on the Western Front.  In 1918 he took command of the Austrlian Corps and spearheded the "hundred days" assault that won the war.  He revolutionized tactics, never lost a battle, was given gredit by the Germans for inventing the blitzkrieg.  His meticulous planning, technical innovations (like air dropping ammunition to advancing troops), and attention to training made is diggers, man for man, about two and half times as effective as other units, as measured by ground captured, prisoners captured, and guns captured.  After the war, in addition to engineering, he was active in veterans' affairs (he sent his idle men to school, "inventing the GI bill"), boy scouts, and other civic afairs.  His face is on the Australian $100 bill. 

kf2qd
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How about Reginald Denny
kf2qd   4/24/2013 10:26:16 AM
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Reginald Denny was an actor and contemprary of Heddy Lamarr. He was in volved in model airplanes and is creduited with developing the first radio control system. Used in gunnery training during WWII.

MichEngineer
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People You Didn't Know Were Engineers
MichEngineer   4/24/2013 10:55:48 AM
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An early candidate would be President Lincoln; no engineering degree, but he designed (and, I believe, patented) a device for raising river boats run aground.

Jim_E
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Carter....
Jim_E   4/24/2013 11:06:18 AM
Carter was never a nuclear engineer as it has been reported over the years, although he did have some limited training in the Navy.

But, he did know enough about nuclear power to avoid harming the industry as badly as he did during his (thankfully) short tenure as president.

We would be far less reliant on coal / gas fired power plants today if the industry wasn't hurt so badly under his presidency.

mwrother
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Great list
mwrother   4/24/2013 11:23:19 AM
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I really enjoyed the slide show. Heady Lamar and Alfred Hitchcock were surprises, as was Tom Scholz from Boston. There seems to be quite a few Naval Acadamy Grads on the list as well, some more notable than others.

I noticed there seems to be a lot of movies and TV serials about Law, Medicine and other professions. I would like to see a list of movies and TV serials with engineering themes. One that come to mind, is "Bridge of the Rive Kwia", "flight of the Pheonix" and "The Worlds Fastest Indian". What are some others?

 

 

NadineJ
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sigh...grrrr
NadineJ   4/24/2013 11:33:39 AM
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I have to admit that I was pretty riled up until the final slide.  I see the question "how to get girls more interested in engineering" asked here often but then, I see a slide show like this highlighting unknown engineers that seem to include a 'token' female.

Hedy Lamarr did a lot to contribute to engineering and the war effort but do we really have to go back 70 years to add a woman to this list?

On a lighter note, don't forget Rowan Atkinson (Mr Bean).

RICKZ28
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Ryan Newman
RICKZ28   4/24/2013 6:55:51 PM
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As a car racing fan, let me add NASCAR driver Ryan Newman that graduated from Purdue University in 2001 with a BS in Engineering.  During his first full year in NASCAR Cup racing in 2002, for Penske Racing, he won six pole positions, won his first race, and was also Rookie of the Year (beating out Jimmie Johnson).  Ryan Newman has won 16 NASCAR Cup races so far during his career, including the Daytona 500 in 2008.  He currently drives for Stewart-Hass Racing, with teammates Tony Stewart and Danica Patrick.

His hobby is collecting vintage cars, his favorite being a 1948 Buick Roadmaster convertible.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryan_Newman

 

Charles Murray
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Eric Fisher
Charles Murray   4/25/2013 7:43:52 PM
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I see that mechanical engineer Eric Fisher is projected to be the first player picked in the NFL draft, which takes place in about 15 minutes.

Charles Murray
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Re: Eric Fisher
Charles Murray   4/25/2013 8:26:45 PM
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Mechanical engineer Eric Fisher was the first player chosen in tonight's NFL draft.

http://www.sbnation.com/nfl/2013/4/25/4179478/nfl-draft-results-2013-eric-fisher-kansas-city-chiefs-first-overall

 

naperlou
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We need more
naperlou   4/29/2013 11:46:08 AM
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Chuck, this is a very instructive list.  It is good to see so many talented people who were educated as engineers.  This is also germaine to the higher education debate going on in this country.  We are often afraid of the rising power of countries like China and India, at least partly becuase they are graduating so many engineers.  At the same time there are articles and columns in American papers talking about the diminishing returns of a college degree.  The problem with those analyses is that they lump all degrees together.  We don't need more social workers and english majors, do we?  We need more engineers, as evidenced by the debate on H1B visas.  Even if some of those engineering grads don't spend most of their career as practicing engnieers, they typically bring analytical skills to areas of endeavour that help them to be successful.  We need more of that.

Charles Murray
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Re: We need more
Charles Murray   4/29/2013 7:25:32 PM
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You're right, naperlou. The Wall Street Journal had an article called, "The Diploma's Vanishing Value," three days ago (link below). Engineering degrees, however, never seem to have a vanishing value, however. I would add that degrees in English and liberal arts have significant value, but that value doesn't translate well to the job market, especially when coming directly out of school.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324874204578440901216478088.html

Charles Murray
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Re: We need more
Charles Murray   5/9/2013 7:21:02 PM
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I agree that it's a bad idea to lump all degrees together when analyzing the value of college, naperlou. Given the lists that come out every year with engineering grads earning the highest average salaries year after year, though, I don't understand why there's always a shortage of engineering graduates. The law of supply and demand would seem to indicate that there would eventually be a surplus of engineering grads, and the starting salaries would drop due to an influx of students migrating to engineering. But that never seems to happen. Year after year, engineering grads have the highest annual starting salaries.

jpratch
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Re: We need more
jpratch   5/16/2013 9:38:42 AM
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"The law of supply and demand would seem to indicate that there would eventually be a surplus of engineering grads, and the starting salaries would drop due to an influx of students migrating to engineering. But that never seems to happen."

The law of supply and demand is sensitive to the "cost of the degree". The reality is that many engineering schools now take five years to complete. This makes an engineering degree 25% more costly than other fields.

Better engineering schools have higher tuition costs, although a mix of commumity college and engineering school can mitigate under some circumstances. But the engineering curricula makes transfer from community college more difficult since foundational engineering and science courses are introduced sophomore year.

The biggest impediment to operation of the law of supply and demand in engineers is that all engineering degrees are hard work! Some fields are "only" difficult, but most are just plain challenging. Folks who "hated trig" or "hated physics" in High School are probably ill suited to taking on an engineering degree in College.

Charles Murray
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Re: We need more
Charles Murray   5/17/2013 6:45:53 PM
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I wholeheartedly agree with your comment, "The biggest impediment to the operation of the law of supply and demand in engineers is that all engineering degrees are hard work," jpratch. As John Sununu put it, "No amount of glibness will get you through a thermodynamics exam." It's a hard degree to get.

Radwan
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Re: We need more
Radwan   10/11/2013 2:05:39 PM
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I think Engi neering course is one of the most deffieclt and interesting subject

espacilly when your studing it or reading with practice ,But in the thered world

its application will falistreted you due to limite application and use,  Even if years

pass you will get more knowladge which you can ont use it in practical life,but

the Engineering people will remain cleaver and smarte as i bielieve . for this reason

Engineers if enter any other field will be in firest class.

Fernydude
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Re: We need more
Fernydude   1/30/2014 4:30:44 PM
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I'm not too worried about the male/female ratio. I think it's looking up, half of our interns this year were female chemical, material science, and electrical. My daughter was just accepted into the Madison School of Engineering last week. I'm so proud of her! With the renewed emphasis on STEM and Advanced Placement classes the curve is changing. I'd say our chemical side is currently 50% or more female and our analytical dept. is 90% female. EE, ME, and software still male dominated here in the Midwest.

Spoofy
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Cindy Crawford
Spoofy   4/29/2013 4:19:35 PM
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Cindy Crawford was awarded a scholarship to Northwestern to study Chemical Engineering, and she attended for a period of time but I don't believe she graduated, and instead went into acting.

Charles Murray
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Re: Cindy Crawford
Charles Murray   4/29/2013 7:14:02 PM
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According to the information that I found, Spoofy, you are correct. Cindy Crawford went to Northwestern for one quarter (they were on quarters, not semesters).

bobjengr
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Platinum
18 People You Didn't Know Were Engineers
bobjengr   4/30/2013 6:18:08 PM
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Very informative post. I have two friends who graduated from engineering schools then went right into law school.   One is now a patent attorney and the other owns a retail establishment ( Starbucks ).  Somewhat sad but reality, I know several graduate engineers who started working as engineers but realized there was no real money in the profession and looked elsewhere for their livelyhood.  I think we can all agree that engineering required critical thinking and that's what other professions can  use. 

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: 18 People You Didn't Know Were Engineers
Charles Murray   5/2/2013 7:49:46 PM
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The problem with engineering has always been that while it offers good salaries straight out of school, the money flattens out pretty fast. I suspect some of these people found ways to keep their salaries moving up the curve, especially the Congressmen who don't have to pay taxes. And, yes, bobjengr, I agree that engineering offers great critical thinking skills.

agriego
User Rank
Gold
Joe Barton
agriego   5/2/2013 7:29:33 PM
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While US Congressman Joe Barton is an engineer, I don't think I would have used him as an example in this article. He's made a habit of saying (and doing) some amazingly ridiculous things over the years.

http://www.time.com/time/politics/article/0,8599,1997963,00.html

 

leaton10
User Rank
Iron
Setting the record straight
leaton10   6/14/2013 9:03:06 AM
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I would like to set the record straight. Jimmy Carter is not an engineer!

I am a Georgia Tech alumnus. Many years ago shortly after Jimmy Carter

left office, the faculty of Ga Tech decided to honor Jimmy Carter by granting him

an honorary engineering degree, due to the fact that he attended Ga Tech for a very short period long ago. I believe it was on quarter. He transferred to a military
 school after that.

When the alumni of Ga Tech got wind of the honorary degree there was a large outcry. So the administration of Ga Tech, in order to preserve the peace, agreed to in the future only consider US presidents with a history at Ga Tech for honorary degrees.


So I repeat - Jimmy Carter has an unearned lambskin - his degree was given to him as part of a ceremony only. It is a degree in Nuclear Engineering.

It should be obvious if you hear him discuss it, he calls it 'nucular' engineering.

RogueMoon
User Rank
Platinum
actor James Hong
RogueMoon   7/25/2013 9:52:27 AM
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American actor, James Hong, studied to be a civil engineer at USC.  He recently starred as "Grandpa Chen" in the movie RIPD.  I remember him best as "David Lo Pan", the villian in Big Trouble in Little China".  He also did a hilarious bit part in an episode of "the Drew Carey Show".

esb
User Rank
Iron
People you didn't know were engineers
esb   8/9/2013 1:26:11 PM
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You neglected GENERAL SIR JOH MONASH, the smartest general you never heard of, unless you are Australian.  His face is on the Australian $100 bill.  When he died, 10% of all the Australians in the world were at his funeral.  He built railroads, introduced reinforced concrete to Australia, and electrified the state of Victoria.  He was also a patent lawyer and a concert pianist.  After he took command of the Australian Corps in 1918, he never lost a battle and spearheaded the "hundred days campaign" which defeated the Germans on the Western Front.  However, most histories of WW1 don't mention him or skip most of his accomplishements, because the Brits didn't like him. (1) He was a reservist, a civilian when the war broke out, not a member of the old boys club.  (2) He was Australian, not British, and used innovative tactics not found in the approved manuals. (3) He was an engineer, not a cavalryman, and entirely too intellectual for the British Army. (He was also fluent in German)  (4) And the reason he wasn't welcome in their officers' clubs, he was a (nonpracticing) Jew.  if you Google him, you will likely find Monash University, named after him, and the town of Monash, built by him.  Several of his concrete bridges are still in use. He was also active in civic affairs, like veterans affairs and the Boy Scouts. 

RTristani
User Rank
Iron
Alan Kulwicki
RTristani   10/11/2013 10:19:10 AM
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Alan Kulwicki received a Bachelors in Mechanical Engineering from University of Wisconsin in 1977, and became the 1992 NASCAR Winston Cup Champion.  At a time when Owner/Driver combinations were rare, Kulwicki used that combination and won the championship.  His death in a plane crash was not only a loss for the racing world, but for the whole world.

 

Thank you for the great story.



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