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William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Energy from Footsteps
William K.   4/23/2013 11:45:46 AM
NO RATINGS
If these tiles are able to recover that much energy per footstep then it must be taking more effort to walk on them, since the energy can only be coming from one source, the walkers. While running on "bouncy" ground is more comfortable it does take more effort. Captured energy has to come from someplace, after all.

Another interesting thought is that if the sidewalk tiles communicate with something else they could probably serve to notify somebody that people are walking past, which might be a law enforcement concern if people were detected walking in some areas late at night.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Harvesting Energy
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   4/23/2013 8:12:33 AM
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Elizabeth –Your point of "high-profile" installations, while still being in relative infancy is precisely what piqued my interest.  As this was your article, I trust you also have them on YOUR radar --- so do you have any information for small investors getting on this band-wagon-?

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: How's this on the feet?
Elizabeth M   4/23/2013 3:47:26 AM
NO RATINGS
Another good point, Rob. The tiles also could be good for the waistline! Although like I said, I don't think it's going to be too much give. I actually think it could be quite a nice cushion for the feet. When I used to run a lot, I liked running on sponge-like surfaces as opposed to concrete. It was quite nice to take that pressure off the joints.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Harvesting Energy
Elizabeth M   4/23/2013 3:37:23 AM
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Yes, Jim, you're right that there are proprietary rights here, and the company did not want to divulge too much information about how the tiles were engineered, as they are still in the early stages of technological development. I'm sure you won't hear the last about this technology, though, so stay tuned for more. I do think it's quite innovative and has great potential, and with the high-profile installations that already have been done, I think it can only get better.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Harvesting Energy
Elizabeth M   4/23/2013 3:32:33 AM
NO RATINGS
That is exactly the point, Chuck. I think these tiles--which the company hopes one day to make as cheap as regular flooring--can be a real energy game changer.

Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Re: Harvest Energy from footsteps
Debera Harward   4/23/2013 12:54:30 AM
NO RATINGS
Jim you are correct those devices provide power to only individuals and the kinetic energy produced was also less as compared to Pavegen.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Harvest Energy from footsteps
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   4/22/2013 11:59:58 PM
NO RATINGS
Debera – I've also seen those devices that were designed to provide power from footsteps.  But each of them (I've seen several) always provided power to the individual, supplying partial power for the various appliances you mention, "on the body".

This idea shifts the paradigm to a much broader target market.  Using literally millions of pedestrians to power municipalities' needs.  Interesting how a simple change of perspective changes this "existing" concept into something new.

Reminds me of something Mr. Spock once said:  "comparing the needs of the one to the needs of the many".

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Harvesting Energy
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   4/22/2013 11:51:46 PM
NO RATINGS
I often am skeptical about the real potential for new ideas to go platinum, (so to speak), but I agree -- O'Hare terminal, or the Manhattan sidewalk are energy sources just waiting to be harnessed.   So, while there were many engineering points not clarified, I accept that's their proprietary right as the technology is being developed.  I decided to dig a little deeper; not so much to investigate the technology, but more to see how I could invest in it.  I learned they are still privately funded, but I'm going to put them on my radar. ( I missed DSL in the 90's and 3DP in the 2000's). This could be huge.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: How's this on the feet?
Rob Spiegel   4/22/2013 8:14:35 PM
NO RATINGS
I think there would have to be some give in order to generate the energy. A little give may not be a walking problem. Actually a little give will help walkers burn more calories, much like running in sand, but not to that extreme.

Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Harvest Energy from footsteps
Debera Harward   4/22/2013 7:40:30 PM
NO RATINGS
Other than this tile technology i have come across a japenese shoe technology as well which helps to generate electricity . The shoe looks like a sandal with a watery cushioned sole inside it when you  put weight on it the water sloshes to generate power ,Generator attached to each pair helps convert   the power into electric energy which helps to juice up your ipod or any electronic device .

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