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Cadman-LT
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Platinum
Re: Printing building
Cadman-LT   6/18/2013 6:54:24 AM
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Ann, it does work with most simple printed parts though correct? Meaning that you can melt down the scraps and reuse them? You do get some scrap don't you?

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Printing building
Cadman-LT   6/18/2013 6:58:00 AM
NO RATINGS
Even if you don't get any scrap, if you printed a part and wanted to make a change to it...you could melt it down and reuse that to reprint it I would hope anyways. I am just talking about like plastic prototype stuff.

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Printing building
Cadman-LT   6/18/2013 7:06:53 AM
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That was just the main advantage I saw with 3D printing...making prototypes before you actually machine the real deal. So instead of wasting material(machining) you could print it and recycle it if there were changes to be made.

Cadman-LT
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Printing building
Cadman-LT   6/18/2013 7:13:05 AM
NO RATINGS
Ann, one last thing on this subject. This might be obvious to some, but I just thought of it. I know the 3D printers are good for prototyping the part and assuring it's correct. What I was wondering was...and if this would work...can you take the model(file) for the 3D printed part and feed it to a cad/cam system so that there are no programming errors, so that it is an exact replica of the prototype? So no programmer error.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Printing building
Ann R. Thryft   6/18/2013 12:13:42 PM
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Cadman-LT, when we're talking about 3D printing a building, it's not usually made of plastic, but of more typical construction materials that begin as powders and are bound together to make a solid like concrete, brick, etc. So there's no melting down involved. For a variety of these materials, see an article I wrote for a UBM sister publication, Future Cities:
Your Next City Block, Printable on Site:
http://www.ubmfuturecities.com/author.asp?section_id=262&doc_id=523906



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