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Elizabeth M
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Blogger
Lots going on in this space
Elizabeth M   4/10/2013 6:06:28 AM
This is one of the latest advancements in solar-cell research, as scientists try to make them more renewable, efficient, powerful and less dependent on non-organic materials. Trees are a natural fit for this technology, though it's interesting that the material taken from trees was used not in the electricity converter but the inert part of the panel that's usually made of plastic or glass.

tekochip
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Platinum
Less Rigid?
tekochip   4/10/2013 8:35:27 AM
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It would be great if they hit 10% efficiency with a less rigid cell. The higher efficiency cells are rather fragile and it makes mounting and protecting them rather costly.


Rob Spiegel
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Re: Lots going on in this space
Rob Spiegel   4/10/2013 9:33:38 AM
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Nice story, Elizabeth. It will be interesting to see how this technology compares to existing technology on price. While the green aspect and the efficiency look good, it would be interesting to see cost comparisons.

Elizabeth M
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Blogger
Re: Lots going on in this space
Elizabeth M   4/11/2013 10:24:35 AM
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Yes, if they can keep the price down then it could definitely be a good alternative to glass or plastic for solar cells, reducing use of synthetic materials and the waste those materials cause. Anything that can do that is definitely a step forward ecologically. While it's good to use natural energy like solar, sometimes the technology itself isn't doing much for the environment. Then again, I hope that if wood from trees is used to make cells, it is also replenished in some way.

naperlou
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Re: Lots going on in this space
naperlou   4/11/2013 10:45:34 AM
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This is a good development.  With the number of cells that would be required to be a viable energy source, the idea that they would not be easily recycled is a problem.  It also adds to their carbon footprint.  If course, the real problem with solar energy is not the cells, but energy storage.  Until that is solved, their use will be limited.

William K.
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Platinum
Recyclable solar cells.
William K.   4/11/2013 10:24:02 PM
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I see a serious rliability problem with solar cells that break down when watter is applied. This is because the intended product lifespan is over 20 years. Quick decomposition is just not the way for a product to last 20 years. Doesn't anybody else see a problem with that?

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Recyclable solar cells.
William K.   4/11/2013 10:24:03 PM
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I see a serious rliability problem with solar cells that break down when watter is applied. This is because the intended product lifespan is over 20 years. Quick decomposition is just not the way for a product to last 20 years. Doesn't anybody else see a problem with that?

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Recyclable solar cells.
Elizabeth M   4/15/2013 4:33:43 AM
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I can see your concern, William K. But I think the idea is to recycle and reuse rather than have a product with a long lifespan that once it's over, becomes yet another piece of garbage in a landfill or in the ocean (where a lot of trash ends up). I am sure this process will be addressed and refined--and better explained--as scientists progress further in their research.

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Recyclable solar cells.
William K.   4/15/2013 11:00:43 AM
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Elizabeth, my point is that giveen the cost and effort to set up a reliable solar cell system it only makes sense to have it last a while. After all, much of the expense is in the installation and supporting system, not in the cell arrays themselves. And based on what I have seen in many other products it is clear that a long product lifetime is not one of the concerns of the makers. Sometimes customers do force a reliability requirement to be considered, but it does not often happen.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Recyclable solar cells.
Elizabeth M   4/16/2013 4:10:08 AM
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Yes, I totally see your point, William K, and solar systems typically last 20 to 25 years. I am pretty sure the designers of this cell are thinking of reliability as well and the cells won't just dissolve under a few drops of water. But I would have to speak more to them about the cells to find out for sure how the recylcling process works.

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