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Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re:Ceramic non-stick?
Ann R. Thryft   4/10/2013 12:28:52 PM
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If my cast iron frying pans cracked, I'd buy new ones; why chance a health problem? The good ones made by Lodge are not expensive, and these days, they're sold pre-seasoned.

Elizabeth M
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Blogger
Re: Simple but I have been told it's stupid, not!
Elizabeth M   4/10/2013 5:39:05 AM
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Tim, these are all good fixes to remedy a design flaw in your pan, but I still think those designing the pan in the first place should've forseen such a problem and fixed it before it was sold. But maybe that's just me! Although you probably could make some good money selling these stands, since it seems like a lot of us have experienced the same problem.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re:Ceramic non-stick?
William K.   4/9/2013 10:25:35 PM
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OK, Ann, I see that if I overheat a teflon pan then the emissions will be toxic, which is just what I said in my previous comment. My thing is that the teflon does not stand up to the mechanical abuse that I give my cast iron pan while doing stir-fry cooking. Mechanical failure of the coating is a separate issue , and the flakes of teflon are simply not very appetising. So I use my iron pan for that reason. 

Of course I am very skeptical of anybody who comes across as trying to create an atmosphere of ambient fear and panic. So my first inclination is to not trust them at all until I examine their credentials, as it were. What I find is an amazing number of people who have no qualifications except being fairly persuasive writers. They have no science background and no educational qualifications, but they want to warn me about some previously unknown hazard that is going to kill me if I don't listen to them. So just like a jury I look at the evidence and consider the source before believing them . 

One other thing is that it seems that a whole lot of advice has been passed by a lawyer to see if there is any way that a person who gets it wrong could have any even slight chance at winning a lawsuit if they got hurt doing something dumb. So much of the published advice that we see is so very "safe" that it is totoally worthless. I am sure that you hve seen this also. 

cookiejar
User Rank
Gold
Simply Modify the handle.
cookiejar   4/9/2013 6:05:19 PM
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If the handle of your pot is too heavy, then the engineering solution is to reduce the handle's weight.  A small pot hardly needs a humungous handle.  You could simply cut its length or if it's solid its thickness.

cookiejar
User Rank
Gold
Re:Ceramic non-stick?
cookiejar   4/9/2013 6:00:45 PM
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I clicked on your link to Consumer Reports, which stated that under normal use, the emissions from Teflon non-stick pans were very low indeed.  If the pan is severely overheated then you have a problem, but then again most things when overheated give off noxious fumes.  There isn't a substance known to man that isn't toxic at some concentration.  This even applies to water which, if drunk to excess will dilute your electrolytes, followed by disorientation, shock and death.  This was proven about a year ago when someone had the idea of having a water drinking competition at a fair as it seemed less disgusting than the traditional pie or hot dog eating contest.  To everyone's shock the winner died on the spot and many of the contestants ended up in hospital.


Just remember, any new device is always introduced as safe.   Time reveals its undesireable side effects which will be vehemently denied by the manufacturer.

 

Keldawwg
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Gold
Re:Ceramic non-stick?
Keldawwg   4/9/2013 4:39:32 PM
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My grandfather was the first person I ever heard question whether or not non-stick cookware was unhealthy... He walked through my Mom's kitchen while she was cooking dinner when I was around 6 or 7 years old and announced that he would not be eating dinner, since she was cooking on "that new-fangled crap... That can't be good for you, and when they come out with a study in 10 years that says that crap will give you cancer, I'll be sure and write you a letter asking if you wouldn't rather listen to the old man now..."

Of course, he died of cancer a couple of years after that... Everyone else, even the smokers all outlived him by many, many years... Most are still alive, including my now 75 year old mother... who smokes...

Virtually all if not all plastics are pretty harmless in their solid form... If eating plastic toys was bad for you my first dog should have never lived to be 16 years old... He ate literally hundreds of small toys... :-O

The ceramic coated cast iron cookware is my personal favorite... Plus, La Creuset comes in some pretty cool colors! The thing I like best is how tough and durable that coating is... The teflon stuff I thought was garbage becuase when it was a few years old, it looked like garbage! All scratched up and nasty looking... And if I was the type who worried about bacteria, that scratched up coating looks like an ideal breeding ground for bacteria...

I, of course, never worry about bacteria, I don't worry about touching hand rails on the escalator, or pushing the buttons for the elevator... Heck, when my wife's not at home I sometimes will come home and discover that I left last nights dinner on the stove, and I just reheat it and eat it... When I go to make a panini and the cheese has green stuff growing on it, I just cut the green stuff off and use the cheese...

I think that this is why I have never had food poisioning in my life... I've been in Mexico with 11 other people that all got sick, and I have never experienced food poisioning... A little bacteria is only bad if your body has never been exposed before... :-)

And teflon only produces toxic flourine compounds when it burns, really... Maybe trace amounts when new, but to really get anything toxic to come off it needs to be on fire...

Growing up, we always used to throw our styrofoam cups in the camp fire... And we had an incinerator in our back yard, and we burned all our plastic garbage along with the paper... We know that's not good for you now, but back then, we had no idea... (Except for my grandpa, that is... But he was dead)

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re:Ceramic non-stick?
Ann R. Thryft   4/9/2013 3:50:11 PM
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William, for health news, I generally depend on Consumer Reports and Science News, neither of which are wild-eyed maniacs. I'd certainly call the production of toxic flourine compounds "poisonous." I read some years ago about PFOA emissions from pans with typical non-stick surfaces, such as Teflon, at high heat. Since then, several brands of "green" non-stick pans came out. Here's a 2009 update from Consumer Reports on the subject:
http://news.consumerreports.org/home/2009/09/best-nonstick-cookware-pfoa-health-risks-swiss-diamond-reinforced-cookware-earth-pan-with-sand-flow.html

tlaren
User Rank
Iron
Simple but I have been told it's stupid, not!
tlaren   4/9/2013 1:33:52 PM
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Many years ago I got a set of what I thought was fairly good cookware. They have lasted about 15 years so far but that little 5" pan just would never stay flat on the stove. I'd always put the handle of something else under the end of its handle.

One day when cooking, a friend arrived and started laughing at my balancing act when I moved the pan and the pancake turner I was using a prop hit the floor. They stated "Put a key ring on it."

After cleaning up from dinner I found a small flashlight with a ring on the end and put the ring thru the loop on the end of the pan handle and to my suprise it actually supported the pan. Now the flashlight is not very washable but it worked.

About a week later I was talking to a woodworking buddy and showed him what I was doing and he got a chunk of hard wood dowel and put a screw eye in the end. We measured it for my stove and made it tall enough to put a key ring loop thru the screw eye and the end of the pan and support the pan.

About a week later he dropped by with a couple very nice pot stands that were all sanded, decorated and sealed. They work great, I keep it on the pan and it just dangles no matter what I am doing, cooking, pouring or washing. When you put the pan on the stove, most of the time it just aligns and rests on it, sometimes it is at an angle and I have to move it vertical.

I think I use the pan a lot more than before because I just don't have that issue. No welding, drilling or just about anything else, I just use the pan. The only thing I would change is change the screw eye and ring and make the screw eye connect directly to the pan. The problem with that is it makes it harder to remove from the pan and I have 4 different ones with different decorations on them and at Christmas I put the Christmas one on, in spring time etc.

If someone decides to make their first million selling these, please send me a few for the idea.

Tim

 

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re:Ceramic non-stick?
William K.   4/9/2013 1:33:44 PM
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Ann, I was not aware that teflon by itself was at all toxic, except that as it burns there are quite a few toxic flourine compounds produced. So I am wondering just where that information about teflon being poisonous came from and more imprtantly just exactly what they are talking about. I have seen too many wild-eyed maniacs sreaming about how almost everything is bad for us to be willing to accept any claim that does not have a rational explanation. So I am genuinely interested in exactly what somebody is talking about when they call Teflon poisonous.

ON the other hand, it is very clear that teflon coated bullets are indeed a very serious source of damage, and one should certainly avoid them as much as one can. ( I just could not resist tossing that one in.)

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re:Ceramic non-stick?
Ann R. Thryft   4/9/2013 1:13:20 PM
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Jim, Teflon-coated cookware is poisonous. I banished it from my kitchen years ago. There are many good brands available of ceramic-coated iron, if that's what you mean by ceramic non-stick: Le Creuset, for example. I don't know if the chemistry of ceramic non-stick coated aluminum or steel has been vetted yet.

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