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Reliabilityguru
User Rank
Platinum
Re: RELIABILITY
Reliabilityguru   7/9/2013 10:12:18 AM
NO RATINGS
Consumer Reports in MHO is biased towards anythng Japanese and especially Toyota. Toyota cars and trucks are rust buckets. Always have been.

GeorgeG
User Rank
Platinum
Re: RELIABILITY
GeorgeG   7/9/2013 9:19:22 AM
The Japanese have an 'old man' tactic. Design teams have at least one old guy who just kibitzes the design effort, mostly just asking difficult questions. They also apply a rigorous scheme of design validation. Manufacturability is always a design constraint: go heavy on design, light on QC; it makes sense: you can't inspect quality in and basic theory shows that if you are able to catch defects, some product must be marginal quality and some will have escaped defects. The most remarkable thing is that Japanese auto guys use less design hours but then there's little tolerance for cowboys in their approach. 

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: No mystery here
Cabe Atwell   5/30/2013 12:43:42 AM
NO RATINGS
Conservative to cool, Toyota is a shining example of automotive excellence. Manufacturing around the world tries to copy their success. I have even had to learn the "Toyota Method." Kaizen...

My 1985 Corolla ran like a champ... no maintenance. Proof.

C

Thinking_J
User Rank
Platinum
Re: No mystery here
Thinking_J   5/21/2013 1:54:47 PM
NO RATINGS
I had a Toyota Corolla - 80s model...

It's alternator fell out on the road while driving.

Only time I experienced that problem... on any car.

Stats ... can be useful.
What do people remember?.....their personal experiences with a car/brand.

Amclaussen
User Rank
Platinum
Re: RELIABILITY
Amclaussen   4/25/2013 10:35:52 AM
Such a short post... such a BIG truth.

Creating a truly good, reliable design is not easy not because it is difficult per se, but because lately designers have lost their orientation.  I remember the old days when creating a new car design was made by actually building a mock model made with clay... there were OLD, experienced design supervisors that came to see the model, and quickly and swiftly pointed a finger to the faults, goofes and poorly designed aspects.  Those old engineers had been educated in the industry and most of them raised step by step from the lowest levels in the company, learning along the years. Experience and being careful and trough is not divorced from being capable of innovating, but is a cultural matter.

Present day designers (in large numbers), are poisoned with the easy of (ab)using CAD, so they become careless and irresponsible, and you can easily spot them: they have never held a wrench in their hands, so they don't have the slightest idea on how to grab them!

On the other hand, I concur with other commenters who say that management is too focused on reducing costs at all means, getting millionaire bonuses and don't caring a thing about the future of their company prestige.

Only education and a strong culture of pride in manufacture could revert the tendencies.

Rigby5
User Rank
Gold
Not bad looking
Rigby5   4/22/2013 6:44:26 PM
NO RATINGS
I like the way the Corolla looks, and I used to buy a lot of Japanese cars in the 1960s and 1970s.  But that was because they were much less expensive then, and simpler.

The last Japanese car I bought was a Datsun 510, and it was nearly indestructable, with one of the best independent rear suspension, rear drive systems out there.

These days a Corolla costs more than a Jetta, so I stay with the German cars, that I know have better parts suppliers and don't rust as fast in the winter salt.  I tend to keep a car for 20 years, so I discover their weaknesses.

 



Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: No mystery here
Cabe Atwell   4/22/2013 6:25:26 PM
NO RATINGS
Rigby5,

This is what my Corolla looked like... aka the "AE86" (this one isn't mine.)

tumblr m2zpea EByf1qd3fyoo1 1280

 

It has quite a following.

Check out this link for more pics: http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/toyota%20ae86

C

 

Rigby5
User Rank
Gold
Re: No mystery here
Rigby5   4/11/2013 5:17:40 PM
NO RATINGS
Bunter, yes I am speculating because I have not worked on Lexus very much.
But all it takes to wipe out a cpu climate control system is an alternator, static, or starter induced voltage spike.

In contrast, a mechanical cable or rod is virtually impossible to fail.

But the main point is that the $500 cpu climate control is not superior to the 10 cent cable.

There are times when more sophisticated systems are better.  No one morns the passing of mechanical voltage regulators for example.  But other times minimalism is better.

I have heard they are putting touch screens in cars now, and that is absurb.  Not only will that be a problem at 40 below, but there should be concern over spread of disease.

Bunter
User Rank
Platinum
Re: No mystery here
Bunter   4/11/2013 3:55:41 PM
NO RATINGS
Honestly Rigby, I think you are moving into the speculative here.

The lexus climate system is more reliable than the complex systems of other  luxury makes that I expect get equal pampering.  It is more reliable than the simpler systems in virtually every manufacturers vehicles excepting other Toyotas and Hondas.  Einstein noted that "reality is an illusion, but a very persistent one".  If the reliability of these climate sytems is only the appearance of reilability it is very persistent.  ;^)

ANd this is true  of every system and area of their vehicles in general regardless of the simplicity or complexity.  Yes, complexity presents more opportunity for problems.  It does not assure that they will happen.  Poor quality control does that even in simple devices.

It is the plausible vs. the probable in my opinion.  Your scenario is plausible-the evidence leads me to conclude that it is more probable that an excellent company can produce reliable products regardless of the complexity.

Well, I suspect we have run this one to death.

Take care.

Dennis

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What is the takeaway from this list?
Charles Murray   4/10/2013 6:37:06 PM
I've had the same experience, bobjengr. I have a 2004 Honda Odyssey with 189,000 miles on it. I've changed the fluids on time and the timing belt, which was the biggest-ticket item but certainly expected. I expect to get 250,000 to 300,000 out of it and I sill continue to trust it on long trips.  

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