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bobjengr
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1 TRILLION FRAMES
bobjengr   4/20/2013 4:09:43 PM
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Richard, I'm running a little behind due to work load but it's probably just as well.  I'm writing this comment on 19 April, right after the terrorist attack on Boston during the marathon.  THE technology that allowed authorities to catch these thugs was aptly demonstrated during that event.  There is no way justice could be served unless surveillance cameras had been employed.   This will be a technology increasing in importance as time goes by.   During my Air Force years, we used "high-speed" cameras for several reasons but certainly not 1 trillion frames per second.  This technology is phenomenal.  Great post.

William K.
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Platinum
one trillion frames per second???
William K.   4/1/2013 9:09:01 PM
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The fastest camera that I have seen was used for evaluating military bullets penetrating armor of various types. The speed was given as "Really fast", since the actual details are sort of proprietary. So there is an existing application already. The other obvious application is in automotive crash testing for crash safety systems development. And probably the system would be quite useful in learning about what really happens in some of the high speed stamping presses. The fastb stamping process is not as simple as it would seem, at least, not in every application.

apresher
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Blogger
Trillion Frames per Second
apresher   4/1/2013 5:17:32 PM
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jhankwitz,  Thanks for the YouTube video link. Fascinating technology.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Control
Ann R. Thryft   4/1/2013 12:34:19 PM
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Last year we reported on a camera invented by Raskar and his colleagues that uses a femto-second laser, to peer around corners:
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=241180
Amazing stuff!



jhankwitz
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Platinum
Re: See it on YouTube
jhankwitz   4/1/2013 10:04:55 AM
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As a Photo Instrumentation/High-Speed Photography major, I spent a summer with Doc Edgerton in his lab at MIT 48 years ago.  It was amazing what we were doing at that time, but unbelievable what's being done now.

jhankwitz
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Platinum
See it on YouTube
jhankwitz   4/1/2013 10:00:11 AM
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You can see this 9-month old video on YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_9vd4HWlVA

naperlou
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Blogger
Control
naperlou   3/31/2013 9:08:14 PM
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Rich, one thing you can do is to use the vision system to control high speed processes.  Very fast cameras let this happen.  Coupled with a smart processing engine at the camera you get a very smart vision system.

TJ McDermott
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Blogger
Re: Impressive Photography
TJ McDermott   3/31/2013 4:44:56 PM
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There are videos on Youtube showing this process.  It's time to go back to school.

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Supercomputers forge ahead
Charles Murray   3/29/2013 7:03:10 PM
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I don't know what anyone would do with one trillion frames/sec, but I now know there's a computer to process it. The University of Illinois this week started its Blue Waters supercomputer, which does one quadillion floating point operations per second (a petaflop).

http://www.engadget.com/2013/03/29/blue-waters-supercomputer-now-online-24-7/

Greg M. Jung
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Platinum
Impressive Photography
Greg M. Jung   3/29/2013 3:21:09 PM
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New technology that shows  "light itself in motion"... This is a must see.  Imagine all of the new applications that this technology could be used for (analysis on optics, explosions, etc.)



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