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jmiller
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Platinum
Re: Hmmm...
jmiller   11/16/2013 4:14:40 PM
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I also wonder what it would feel like to have a bike brake or steer without me knowing or predicting what it is going to do.  Would it just wipe me out?  Don't know but will be interesting to monitor.

jmiller
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Hmmm...
jmiller   11/16/2013 4:13:25 PM
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I think there are already plenty of different options that help maximize our vision and things like that.  I see this and other improvements that are an effort to extend the current human abilities.  Stop the bike faster than a human.  Or see something that humans can't see.  Make a prediction on the facts or surroundings that cause a precautionary response faster than we as humans can do it.  I think it's possible but wonder about the costs and value.

78RPM
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Hmmm...
78RPM   11/5/2013 3:14:13 PM
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@jmiller, you raise a good question. Perhaps the speed could just be displayed on an LCD. What is more important in cities is to see jerks behind you. Perhaps we need a rear-facing camera that flips the image right/left (as a mirror would) and displays the picture above the handle bars. Hmm, but why not just use a mirror? Maybe some value add could be brought in here using the Raspberry Pi that a mirror could not -- other sensors perhaps.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Hmmm...
Charles Murray   4/12/2013 7:35:47 PM
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If we're talking about commandeering the brakes and steering, I don't see why it can't be done, JMiller. We just need to wait a few decades for the costs to come down.

Cabe Atwell
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Blogger
Re: Pi-Powered Projector
Cabe Atwell   4/2/2013 11:19:53 PM
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I have a few Raspberry Pi boards... I only wish they had a little more power. Something on par with the recent Smartphones. Then the Pi would be a DIY behemoth. PIC/ARM/and Arduino dev boards still rule the roost for the most part.

Also, aside from a head's up display, I hope they add some way to project warnings on the road to alert automobile drivers. Then, they have a great HUD system for bikes..

C

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Pi-Powered Projector
Charles Murray   4/1/2013 7:20:31 PM
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 That is the key, isn't it, naperlou? Right now, the technology forces the driver to look down, instead of ahead. Someone needs to do a study on how long it takes your eyes to look at the display and then re-focus on the road ahead. In vehicles, I think it's always been assumed that it takes 0.4 seconds for a driver's eyes to look down at the speedometer and then return to the road. Head-up displays were able to reduce that figure. A bike, however, goes slower than a car, so the readjustment time doesn't translate to as many feet travelled.

naperlou
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Blogger
Re: Pi-Powered Projector
naperlou   3/31/2013 10:14:46 PM
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This works at night, and looks really good.  It would be interesting to see if there is a display technology that would allow you to project this in some way to a point in front of the bike that was perhaps not the ground.  That would allow a display that could be used during the day and could integrate some of those other sources.  The Raspberry Pi platform could easily handle that.

jmiller
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Hmmm...
jmiller   3/31/2013 12:05:15 PM
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I wonder how far we are from adding technologies that alert bike riders to the dangers that are coming at them.  "Dog on your right."  "Another bike coming up behind you."  "Watch out for a motorist on the right!"  We are seeing accident avoidance in cars already, will it go to bikes next?  Or will that just distract the rider and cause more problems.  Don't know.  Cool to see stuff like this expanding into other areas though.

notarboca
User Rank
Gold
Re: Hmmm...
notarboca   3/30/2013 1:01:12 PM
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Yes, selling top end gadgets to bicyclists is almost a sure thing. I would like to see heartrate info next to the speed, because your're usually trying to keep heartrate within a narrow range for the best aerobic exercise.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Hmmm...
Charles Murray   3/29/2013 7:06:42 PM
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Good point, Zippy. It is a bit of a distraction, since the driver is looking down when they should be looking ahead. Still, I find the video so interesting...

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