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apresher
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Blogger
Lithium Ion Batteries
apresher   3/28/2013 10:43:39 AM
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Chuck,  Thanks for this report. Excellent article on this technology problem and how it is being addressed.

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Manufacturing
tekochip   3/28/2013 12:30:11 PM
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It looks like, more than anything, a more robust manufacturing method needs to be defined.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Definitely not good news
Elizabeth M   3/28/2013 12:47:04 PM
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Seems like we have a recurring problem here. I hope the industry gets this sorted out quickly. Do you think these types of findings could require major product recalls? That could be disastrous.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Definitely not good news
NadineJ   3/28/2013 1:07:02 PM
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My first question when I saw the Article was "how big of a problem is this?"  This is a multi billion dollar industry that's been around for a while.

From what I understand, Boeing tried to push the technology forward and missed their mark.  I'm surprised to see this issue in the auto industry.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Definitely not good news
Charles Murray   3/28/2013 6:33:21 PM
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A recall is a possibility, Liz. Mitsubishi has not made an announcement as yet.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Definitely not good news
Charles Murray   3/28/2013 6:40:07 PM
The Chevy Volt actually had a problem with a lithium-ion fire, too. In Chevy's case, though, the problem occurred after crash-testing, which is different than this. As to how big of a problem it was, I specifically asked Donald Sadoway of MIT, who is one of the world's foremost battery experts and founder of a grid storage battery company called Ambri, whether the media was making a big deal out of a small story. His full response: "The press is right to call attention to the precarious nature of Li-ion technology. It's one thing to have a fire in a plant. It's another to have a fire in a plane at 40,000 feet. Remember, Li-ion technology is 20 years old now. Shouldn't we have worked out the bugs by now?"

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Next Generation Battery Technologies
Greg M. Jung   3/28/2013 9:38:15 PM
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It seems the that current lithium-ion technology has to find a safe, reliable way to counteract the energetic and rapid discharge nature of these batteries before wide-spread adoption should truly be deployed.

 

Is there another battery technology appearing on the horizon soon that is safer than lithium-ion?

a.saji
User Rank
Silver
Re: Next Generation Battery Technologies
a.saji   3/29/2013 12:02:40 AM
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@Greg: Lithium Batteries always had this issue and it happened to something else sometime back. I simply cannot see why they did not see it coming their way after knowing the impacts

ChriSharek
User Rank
Gold
Air or liquid cooled?
ChriSharek   3/29/2013 9:15:11 AM
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Was this battery air-cooled like the Nissan Leaf and Boeing, or liquid cooled like the Volt and the new Ford PHEV and EVs? 

ChriSharek
User Rank
Gold
Re: Definitely not good news
ChriSharek   3/29/2013 9:16:52 AM
Charles, you should know better than to brought the Volt fire up . . . that fire had NOTHING to do with the lithium ion battery.  It was the coolant surrounding the battery that leaked on a circuit board that caused the short circuit.  It was NOT the Li battery. 

Shame on you, Charles . . .

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