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apresher
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Cyberwarfare
apresher   3/27/2013 2:11:16 PM
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Interesting question, and there's no question that this is an issue that must continue to be addressed both by technology and user awareness/training.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Cyberwarfare
Cabe Atwell   3/27/2013 5:40:04 PM
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I think cyber security and warfare will be more important than the lock on our doors or troops on the ground. Perhaps it is for the better too. Less deaths mean more people are given the chance to prosper and create.

C

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Cyberwarfare
Ann R. Thryft   3/28/2013 2:34:37 PM
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Thanks for this report, Cabe. Fascinating stuff, and scary to learn that cyber-attacks may be interpreted as formal declarations of war. But I can't agree that more people are a good thing when overpopulation is directly related to the number and scope of the planet's environmental problems.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Cyberwarfare
Cabe Atwell   3/28/2013 4:16:02 PM
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Indeed.. a virtual false-flag is sure to be raised.

Sad days on the way..

C

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Cyberwarfare
William K.   3/28/2013 11:40:09 PM
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Ann, you are certainly correct. But I can assure you that cyberwar is, at least so far, more humane than the military bullets and bombs type of warfare. Of course that may change if some decide to hack into all of he various robotic things that are in use. Just consider what it could do to a portion of the power grid if somebody were able to switch everything off and on at the same time, and then started cycling it with a three second period. Probably they could take down any grid that thy attacked, and also do a lot of damage to individual systems. Possibly a different cycle rate would be more damaging, but that one certainly could cause problems.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Cyberwarfare
Ann R. Thryft   4/1/2013 11:57:24 AM
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William, I was responding to Cabe's statement that "Less deaths mean more people are given the chance to prosper and create." which sounded to me like it implied that it's OK for more people to live and reproduce. I know he didn't say that, but more people actually means a lot more people, since reproducing is one of the things humans (or any other animals) do when we prosper.

Dave Palmer
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Re: Cyberwarfare
Dave Palmer   4/1/2013 1:48:40 PM
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@Ann: There are definite social, economic, and ecological advantages to smaller family sizes.  However, discussions of overpopulation are often problematic.

El Salvador, with 761 people per square mile, is often considered to be "overpopulated," while countries with higher population densities (such as Belgium, with 945 people per square mile, or the Netherlands, with 1287 people per square mile) are not.

Many of the countries with the highest population densities (Monaco, Singapore, Bahrain, Malta, Taiwan, etc.) have relatively high standards of living, while many of the countries with the lowest population densities (Mongolia, Western Sahara, Namibia, etc.) have very low standards of living.

That's not to say that there are no limits to population growth, but I think most of the resource problems in today's world are more related to the distribution of resources (wasteful overconsumption in some places, while others don't have enough), rather than the total number of mouths to feed.

The idea that there is anything good about people dying in war is rather horrifying. 

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Cyberwarfare, other warfare
William K.   4/1/2013 9:31:58 PM
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You are certainly correct about the idea of people dying in war being horrifying. It goes way beyond horrifying: remember, somebody said that " war is hell", but my opinion is that it is way worse than that. But please, don't anyone take that as a heresy or an attack on anybody's religious beliefs. 

My assertion is based on the reality that you don't have to die to go to war, and that sometimes it sticks to you even if you do come back. 

But as soon as there is found a way to link computers to our brains, which some are working toward even now, cyber warfare will take a large step toward being just as nasty as the gun and bomb type of warfare. That will be one of those "unintended consequences" that people were not thinking about as they blasted the lid off of Pandoras box. ( That reference to Greek mythology is a very handy way to describe a concept.) I hope that a few other people consider that reality. PLEASE!!

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Cyberwarfare, other warfare
Ann R. Thryft   4/4/2013 12:15:56 PM
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William, thanks for an eloquent description. I have been close to men who served in Vietnam, as friends and boyfriends. My father was at Guadacanal in WWII. I know what bringing it home means. I also like your reference to Pandora's Box--good metaphor.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Cyberwarfare, other warfare
William K.   4/4/2013 9:29:14 PM
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Ann, it really could be bad if there is ever a real brain to computer link. Just look at the damages done by viruses in computers today and imagine what could be done to a mind.

Perhaps somebody with a bit more clout than I can muster should see about pushing for some laws to limit the whole field of endevor, and get the limits in place before the damage begins.

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