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Elizabeth M
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Good idea
Elizabeth M   3/19/2013 8:14:16 AM
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This is a really good idea that Google's come up with (so long as they don't use it for any wireless tracking service to see where users are...you never know!). I'm sure it behooves wireless carriers to know where they are underutilizing spectrum to provide better coverage. And if smart devices can find unused spectrum when they need it, wireless connectivity will no doubt improve and provide better service to people.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Good idea
Ann R. Thryft   3/19/2013 1:34:23 PM
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What a great idea. And a long time coming. I used to be a comms reporter, writing about all the different bands and what was being used for what. This would have come in handy.



Elizabeth M
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Re: Good idea
Elizabeth M   3/19/2013 1:44:38 PM
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I was a comms reporter, too, Ann, and was thinking pretty much the same thing. Seems like this could've been done ages ago, and is quite handy.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Good idea
Ann R. Thryft   3/19/2013 1:48:56 PM
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You, too? I used to use big paper posters with charts that one of the vendors put together annually as a holiday handout. They were clumsy, but better than nothing.

bob from maine
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Platinum
Re: Good idea
bob from maine   3/20/2013 10:22:22 AM
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I'd think the International Telecommunications Union would get a little testy trying to deal with the concept of frequency-agile equipment capable of jumping bands. And of course our own FCC may feel a little threatened having civilians question their frequency-band re-allocations. I expect there to be some interesting fallout from the data provided.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Good idea
Ann R. Thryft   3/20/2013 1:21:44 PM
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Frequency-hopping is not a new idea; I remember writing about it ages ago, when there was a lot more "white space" available. As long as the technology works, why not? I agree, the fallout will be very interesting.

William K.
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Re: Good idea
William K.   3/20/2013 4:27:51 PM
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Frequency hopping is only a "sort of good" idea if there are a lot of users to share those frequencies. And as soon as the number of users is equal to the number of alloted frequencies it slows down quite a bit. And when there are more users than there are frequencies things get really stupid. The fact is that there are not that many assigned frequencies, and so there will be problems, because the other thing that happens is folks raise the transmit power to improve their likelyhood of overpowering the interference, which enlarges the area where that frequency can't be used by others. Sort of like at a party where some folks talk louder to be heard over the others talking louder to be heard. See what I mean?

A MUCH better choice would have been for the FCC to issue liceses and restrict the number assigned to each frequency set. Better yet, the FCC should refuse to allow those devices that are just for making short wireless connections. Using wires does not use up spectrum. Less convenient, but cheaper as well.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Good idea
Cabe Atwell   3/20/2013 10:51:13 PM
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I hope the power that be open up more of the wireless spectrum to the public. CB radio is incredibly outdated. We need a CB band for open wireless communication.

C

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Good idea
Ann R. Thryft   3/21/2013 1:49:36 PM
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William, I guess you answered my "as long as the technology works, why not?" question. Sounds analogous to cable internet--the more users, the worse performance gets. That explains why it's not being talked about much any more. I also see your point about wired vs wireless.




William K.
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Platinum
Re: Good idea
William K.   3/21/2013 2:09:55 PM
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Cabe, any additional unregulkated bandwidth would quickly become exactly the same as the Citizens band radio service that you describe as lame. Besides that there already is more bandwidth set up for use as the "family radio service", already. Those frequencies are available to anybody who buys a radio set to use them. What we certainly do not need is something with internet bandwidth. MY point is that for those who are not technically competent enough to purchase radios from any of dozens of sellers, why should such folks be allowed to talk anyway? 

And if you want to do it on your smart phone, there is always twitter, which is not really much different from the CB radio that you call lame, except that it has more modern technology.

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