HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
<<  <  Page 4/6  >  >>
solarsculptor
User Rank
Silver
Re: Point of confusion
solarsculptor   3/19/2013 12:16:12 PM
NO RATINGS
ChasChas, it may be confusing, but remember an internal combustion engine has an efficiency close to 12%, an electric motor is over 90% so it can only be an improvement over what has bee a standard since the model "T".  Cars are transportation appliances, it's time engineers started a complete redesign of them.

The new hybrids and electric technologies have to be supported by the design community as vital first steps on the path to some future vehicle that we can't imagine right now. Batteries, controls, tires, materials, all of these things will improve if companies decide to leave the past behind. Just doubleing the efficiency of current cars to a meager 24% would be a huge improvement.

ChasChas
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Point of confusion
ChasChas   3/19/2013 11:47:22 AM
NO RATINGS
 

It's bad enough when we are forced to live by a bureaucratically twisted Constitution.

Now we are forced to engineer using bureaucratically twisted data.

(Much like the global warming "hockey stick" graph.)

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Point of confusion
Charles Murray   3/19/2013 11:36:02 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes, it is bureaucratic confusion, ChasChas, largely because there is no single standard. And it gets worse. It's worth noting that my previous explanation was for the all-electric mode of the vehicle, which is simpler to calculate. When you get into plug-in hybrid calculations, there can be an infinite number of fuel efficiency ratings, depending on how you drive the car. A driver who drives 10 miles to work every day, ten miles back and then recharges at night, will have one number. A driver who exhausts the 32-mile range of the battery and drives the next 200 miles on diesel fuel will get another figure entirely.

ChasChas
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Point of confusion
ChasChas   3/19/2013 11:18:06 AM
NO RATINGS
 

I know what a KWh costs.

I know what a gallon of gas costs.

What does a gallon of e cost?

This nothing but bureaucratic confusion, isn't it? - nothing to do with engineering.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Point of confusion
Charles Murray   3/19/2013 11:15:43 AM
NO RATINGS
In answer to your question, laser_scientist, the vehicle would not have to stop to recharge in the European Commission methodology. It would travel until it exhausts its battery charge (approximately 32 miles). Then it would travel the remainder of the 62-mile distance by burning the diesel fuel in the hybrid powertrain. Then they calculate its fuel efficiency.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: I am a VW fan
Charles Murray   3/19/2013 11:07:56 AM
NO RATINGS
Rob, I don't think the $130K figure is a viable one, but it comes from a New York Daily News article (link below). I've also seen where industry analysts have predicted the price will come in between $40K and $70K, which sounds like a better guess to me, albeit still a guess. Volkswagen has not announced a price.

http://www.nydailynews.com/autos/gas-prices-solved-new-volkswagen-xl1-hybrid-261-mpg-article-1.1285480

Francois Racicot
User Rank
Iron
Polycarbonate windsheald ?
Francois Racicot   3/19/2013 10:39:56 AM
NO RATINGS
Looks like a very nice concept car that could hit the road.  One concern I have though: what will a polycarbonate windsheeld look like after a few years of dust/rain/snow and a few wiper sweeps ?  Will it look like the polycarbonate headlights that have to be polished regularly if you don't want them to be foggy ?  It will also be interesting to see how it performs at the IIHS impact test.

That said, VW makes great cars, and this one should be notting but great !

 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Point of confusion
Charles Murray   3/19/2013 10:35:23 AM
NO RATINGS
First, let me warn you, ChasChas, converting to MPG-e is not an exact science. But here's an off-the-cuff response to your question. The easiest method I know of is to divide kWh/gallon of gasoline by kWh/mile. The question becomes: What's a viable number for kWh per gallon of gasoline? Nissan and GM originally used the ready-made figure of 82 kWh/gal, which was absurdly high and accounted for the ridiculous figures that were orginally publicized for the Volt (230 mpg-e) and Leaf (367 mpg-e) in 2009. The EPA later came in and said, "No, it should be 33 kWh/gallon of gasoline," (see what I mean about it not being an exact science?). So let's use 33. And let's use the 6 miles/kWh mentioned for the new Volkswagen mentioned in the story. In that case, you'd divide 33 kWh/gallon by 0.167 kWh/mile (that's the inverse of the number I mentioned in the story), and you'd get 197 MPG-e.

We wrote about this subject a couple of years ago here: http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1366&doc_id=212373

tutor
User Rank
Bronze
Re: I am a VW fan
tutor   3/19/2013 10:28:29 AM
NO RATINGS
i was hoping to place an order (for REAL, to add it to my fleet of 200-2001 Honda Insights), but not at thet price. Actually, not even at 1/4 of that price :(


Rob

Bunter
User Rank
Platinum
Some thoughts.
Bunter   3/19/2013 10:16:32 AM
NO RATINGS
This is a cool vehicle. It is really a focused high performance vehicle rather than a broadly practical car. It just happens that the high performance focus of this car is efficiency. No one needs a high performance vehicle-we get them because they give us pleasure and can provide status gratification if that is important. And we pay a premium for the pleasures.

I think this could work for VW, as long as they don't delude themselves that it is mainstream, and the profitable price does not exceed the value of the pleasure and status derived the buisness case could fly. And, as with any high performance vehilce, the lessons learned can be legitimized in the public mind and applied more broadly to other mainstream products.

It will be fun to see this unfold.

Cheerio,

Dennis

<<  <  Page 4/6  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Researchers in Canada have developed a chin strap that harvests energy from chewing and can potentially power a digital earplug that can provide both protection and communication capabilities.
In case you haven't heard, the deadline to enter the 2014 Golden Mousetrap Awards is coming up fast Oct. 28! Have you entered yet?
Made by Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
A Tokyo company, Miraisens Inc., has unveiled a device that allows users to move virtual 3D objects around and "feel" them via a vibration sensor. The device has many applications within the gaming, medical, and 3D-printing industries.
In the last few years, use of CFD in building design has increased manifolds. Computational fluid dynamics is effective in analyzing the flow and thermal properties of air within spaces. It can be used in buildings to find the best measures for comfortable temperature at low energy use.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service