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Stuart21
User Rank
Silver
Re: I am a VW fan
Stuart21   1/15/2014 10:51:56 AM
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Would love to have a 130 mpg Passat Wagon or a 100 mpg transporter. If they can do 260 for a two seater, should not be impossible to do half that in a 4 seater with decent luggage space - or a 100 mpg Microbus with windows all round & a sunroof!  ;-)

Unfortunately its only the absolute high miler / least useful vehicle that 'gets the oil' - as in media traction -

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: A few niggling doubts
William K.   11/22/2013 5:47:22 PM
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Orin, NOBODY NEEDS AIR CONDITIONING! In addition, if the vehicle has a liquid cooled battery and engine then there should be enough waste heat available to keep it reasonably comfortable in the winter, at least if they include a bit of foam insulation between the inside shell and the outer skin. 

Probably it would not be very smart to attempt to use one of these in a place like Colorado, or any of the other states that have those very steep hilly roads. But we can trace the underpowered VWs all the way back to some of the originals, which could not do much better than 42MPH on many of the highways in Virginia. So VW has a legacy of being underpowered, the difference here is that probably the electric drive will not have a gear ratio adequate for handling hills, since variable spped electric drives don't need a lot of different drive ratios. 

Besides all of that, by the time a vehicle has all of that extra safety stuff added it will no longer be able to produce such good mileage.

Those gull wing doors were never practical and in all probability will never ever be practical. But of course, they do look sort of cool.

etmax
User Rank
Gold
Re: I am a VW fan
etmax   9/24/2013 10:32:32 AM
NO RATINGS
Hi Charles, as is so often the case they don't say what conditions are needed to achieve the efficiency. I drive a 3.0L V6 conventional car the weighs in at about 1.5 ton and get around 40mpg on level smooth roads at 100kph, yet if I only do 60kph I get 52mpg. interestingly (not surprisingly) if I drive much slower than about 50kph the economy worsens.


Because a hybrid can turn the ICE off and have no litres per hour factor in the equation you could get some interesting No's by driving 5kph over glass.

I just hope for the environments sake (and the purchasers) it has good real world No's


Certainly is a nice looking eco vehicle though.

Stuart21
User Rank
Silver
Useful
Stuart21   7/10/2013 9:47:09 AM
NO RATINGS
261 MPG is great, but be nice if it was more useful. How about a wagon on the same chassis, with a Kamm rear end?

Should not cut mileage too much - & then I would be interested in buying. Well, interested ;-)

VW, when you need better traction, give me a call.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: A few niggling doubts & gull wing doors
William K.   5/30/2013 4:11:50 PM
NO RATINGS
Thos gull wing doors are put there because a door has to hinge on something and if you can get rid of the bending moment delivered by a hard-top door a lot of things get much lighter. That is the reason, which is that there is no way to make a stiff enough "A-Post" to support the door. So gull wing doors are an easy out to handle the problem of how to support the doors. Yes, they do look cool but I find thm very inconvenient.

Orin Laney
User Rank
Silver
A few niggling doubts
Orin Laney   5/30/2013 1:00:07 PM
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Gull wing doors are a cliche' that designers use to make an automobile look really mod and futuristic.  I doubt they have any aerodynamic advantage, and the disadvantage is what happens if you open a forward facing one while rolling.  The forward facing but normally hinged "suicide doors" used on some pre-WWII cars were banned for compelling safety reasons.  Just don't open the doors a highway speed, you say?  Ah, but people do for all sorts of reasons e.g. to free a seatbelt or reseat a partially latched door.

This sounds like a great car if you live where the land is flat and the climate is perfect.  Using the tricks mentioned, you can go fast with a low power to weight ratio on a flat road, but I'd like to know what happens to speed going uphill. Sure, the peak capability of electric drive can zip you over a neighborhood hill on your way to the Piggly-Wiggly, but there are mountain passes in Colorado, Calikfornia, Utah, and elswehere that require pushing hard for miles at high alititude.  The resulting load will exceed the thermal time constant of the electric drive.  What then?  There is also the effect on mileage when a heater or air conditioner is running.  Those aren't optional in Michigan or Arizona.

And those tires...  Early autos used narrow tires.  They require high air pressure to be stiff enough to carry weight up on the smaller footprint.  This makes for a bumpy ride and reduced ability to handle mud and snow.  That's why they disappeared.

I wonder if those are coaster brakes...

GeorgeG
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Weight and snow.
GeorgeG   4/23/2013 10:44:20 AM
NO RATINGS
My brother owned a VW bug. With heavily lugged snow tires it went through deep snow almost like a snowmobile thanks to the contoured belly pan.      

GeorgeG
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Weight not that big a deal
GeorgeG   4/23/2013 10:39:09 AM
NO RATINGS
There aren't really any tricks - get the road weight, cross section, drag coeeficient and tire heating down, and Bob's your uncle. Simple things like the precision of fit-up of body panels and under-body skins make a difference. Electric motors have a high intermittent stall torque and horsepower relative to continous ratings which allows them to pack a lot of performance into a low continuous horsepower rating. Well deployed hybrid technology allows the combustion engine to work into sweet spots. As you point out, no magic is needed.  

GeoOT
User Rank
Silver
Weight not that big a deal
GeoOT   4/2/2013 9:56:24 PM
NO RATINGS
The 1,753 pound weight is 40 pounds more than the 1,713 pound weight of the '84 Honda CRX HF that I used to have. That car didn't have any carbon fiber or anything more exotic than aluminum for the engine bllock and transmission case.  Of course, it didin't have any airbags either but we haven't heard whether the new VW meets those American requirements.  Likely not.  BTW, the Honda was rated at 50 mpg highway, a figure that was achieved by many owners.  No tricks, just a well engineered light car that met American regulations of the era.

Jerry dycus
User Rank
Gold
Re: VW paper cars
Jerry dycus   3/29/2013 12:46:44 PM
NO RATINGS
 

                If you google freedomev and hit image the black vehicle that pops up is my all composite body/chassis stronger than steel but only 235lbs.

 

               A very old wiki freedomev I think is somewhat good now. It had been hacked by chinese though have no idea why as rhey did it in chinese!!

 

              Once my 2wh EV Streamiliner is presentable and a few products in the next 6 months, I'll come out with a serious website but not smart to do if no product yet now.  I could do a website now but wouldn't have any time left because of all the questions and have too much work still to do.

 

         

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