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Elizabeth M
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Blogger
Wow
Elizabeth M   3/7/2013 6:51:25 AM
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This is actually pretty amazing and could be a massive breakthrough for medical science. Yes, i know it's controversial, but it is the future, especially if we want to provide better medical care for people and make it cost effective and less invasive. Of course, it also seems a bit creepy to be 3D printing human tissue, but it's also quite incredible to think about in terms of how far medicine and technology have come. Thanks for covering this, Cabe!

tekochip
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Platinum
What Material
tekochip   3/7/2013 7:41:17 AM
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What material do they use in the printer, and how do they make the material?  That's just as important as the process.

sensor pro
User Rank
Gold
Re: What Material
sensor pro   3/7/2013 11:07:23 AM
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I would like to get some info on that material also. It is very important to be sure that there is no withdrawal problems what it is introduced into a human body.

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Re: What Material
tekochip   3/7/2013 11:14:05 AM
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So very often when we talk about advances in technology what we really have is an advancement in material.  It's not so much that we have a new gadget or procedure, it's that we finally have a new material which allows us to use existing technology (a 3D printer) in new ways.


sensor pro
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Gold
Re: What Material
sensor pro   3/7/2013 11:19:45 AM
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So true. We often overlook that fact.

If you ge any real answers on the material, please post it.

Thanks

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Wow
Charles Murray   3/7/2013 5:42:41 PM
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Chris Anderson, the editor-in-chief of Wired Magazine, recently declared that 3D printing would one day be bigger than the Internet. Advances like this one are why.

http://www.siliconvalleywatcher.com/mt/archives/2012/11/chris_anderson_1.php

 

BrainiacV
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Wow
BrainiacV   3/8/2013 9:53:54 AM
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As a liver transplantee, I'm very much interested in these stories. When my new liver wears out in about 20 years, I'd love to get a replacement from my own cells and be able to get off the immunosuppressants I have to take twice daily which make me susceptible to skin cancer. It's been two years and I've already had to have two spots treated with liquid nitrogen to freeze them off.

And then after that, I want a brain extension :-)

gaga1017
User Rank
Iron
material?
gaga1017   3/8/2013 10:08:33 AM
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Do we simply remove ourselves from the moral issue by casually saying, "though it's a controversial topic"? We have a responsibility as engineers to consider all aspects of our work. Yes, there are areas that though possible, interesting, intellectually challenging, and even "beneficial" for medical advancement, we must consider the cost. Destroying one human life to enhance another is not acceptable, even though it is technically possible and a really "neat" advancement!

eafpres
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Gold
Not 3D
eafpres   3/8/2013 10:19:09 AM
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To clarify--I read the abstract, downloaded the paper, and looked through the results.  What they are doing is: (1) starting with viable embryonic stem cells, (2) putting them into a culture medium, (3) "printing" meaning using a printer like setup to form droplets droplets of cells+medium along with just medium to form (4) a droplet or blob which contains as few as 5 cells and is as small as 0.25 mm, (5) printing a grid (array) of these of various sizes and cell concentrations, then (6) inverting the droplet holder so that gravity acts on the cells and causes them to coalesce into spheriod shapes.

That's it.  The "breakthrough" is controlling the size of the resulting droplets and cell amounts which would be useful in research work, and increasing the percent of cells which survive the process.  No 3D.  No organs coming out the end of a printer.

Cabe Atwell
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Blogger
Re: Not 3D
Cabe Atwell   3/8/2013 4:23:40 PM
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Eafpres,

It's good you were able to access the paper and took the time to summarize. It is all true. They are not printing anything but globs, so to speak. But, it is the first step in the right direction.

With the recent 3D printed bone and organs being successful, all work in this area is necessary.

C

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