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Andreas Tanda
User Rank
Silver
Public Knowledge and 3D Printing
Andreas Tanda   2/18/2013 2:11:25 PM
NO RATINGS
Cabe - thank you for this article. It is always surprising to see how the topic of 3D printing evolves and that these systems are getting cheaper and cheaper. So we reach a level where everyone can afford such a piece of interesting hardware. Therefore it would be interesting to see how people will deal with ideas like: http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&co1=AND&d=PTXT&s1=8,286,236.PN.&OS=PN/8,286,236&RS=PN/8,286,236 .   

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Public Knowledge and 3D Printing
Cabe Atwell   2/18/2013 2:48:54 PM
NO RATINGS
That is quite the patent. Sum it up for us is a few sentences. :)

I have a feeling that a 3D printer comes with a certain level of buyer's remorse.

C

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Nice one
Elizabeth M   2/19/2013 5:23:03 AM
NO RATINGS
Even the at-home genius inventor needs some technical help once in awhile. :) At a fairly affordable price, this intuitive printer should help even the least tech-savvy hobbyist creator give life to designs. It sounds pretty handy.

Larry M
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Public Knowledge and 3D Printing
Larry M   2/19/2013 9:15:59 AM
NO RATINGS
The patent seems to require that CAD files include an authorization code and that the 3D printer will not print unless it accepts the authorization code. There's no need for such a code on a personal printer.  No code-->No infringement.

Larry M
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Public Knowledge and 3D Printing
Larry M   2/19/2013 9:16:24 AM
NO RATINGS
The patent seems to require that CAD files include an authorization code and that the 3D printer will not print unless it accepts the authorization code. There's no need for such a code on a personal printer.  No code-->No infringement.

sam_who
User Rank
Iron
Re: Public Knowledge and 3D Printing
sam_who   2/19/2013 9:34:29 AM
NO RATINGS
descent? ... decent, maybe?  

Steve Heckman
User Rank
Gold
Re: Public Knowledge and 3D Printing
Steve Heckman   2/19/2013 9:36:14 AM
NO RATINGS
The use of such a code would imply someone selling 3D CAD designs with the specific intent for them to be printed, or a private company wanting to protect their designs from "outsiders". This would in no way stop someone from creating their own 3D model on their own. They would just have to work harder.

Analog Bill
User Rank
Gold
Re: Public Knowledge and 3D Printing
Analog Bill   2/19/2013 11:21:42 AM
NO RATINGS
"descent" is a noun meaning going down or coming down ... it looked a little weird to me, too, but it's proper use.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Public Knowledge and 3D Printing
Cabe Atwell   2/19/2013 4:56:20 PM
NO RATINGS
Patents that restrict progress and innovation are not high on my list to celebrate. Any software protection can be side-stepped, so good luck with enforcement. I am sure that "Physibles" will require some level of protection, someday. Right now, it's the wild-west in this area.

C

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Material Costs?
Jack Rupert, PE   2/25/2013 3:56:26 PM
NO RATINGS
The price of the device that is given in the articles seems very reasonable for the serious at-home inventor or small shop.  Any idea what the raw material costs and/or if you are required to use material specifically made for that printer?  Just wondering if the business model is the same as for desktop printer where the hardware is reasonable (or cheap) but they get you on the supplies?

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